News that matters to us all.

  • Study: Adult Use Marijuana Laws Do Not Adversely Impact Traffic Fatality Rates
    By Paul Armentano From NORML   The enactment of statewide laws regulating the adult use and sale of cannabis is ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-23
  • Rhode Island to form recreational cannabis study commission
    Rhode Island’s Senate and House of Representatives voted to end their debate over recreational marijuana legalization bills and instead created a 19-person commission to study the issue. Among the commission’s mandates – after the Senate agreed Thursday with an earlier House vote to halt any MJ legislation – is the exploration of the recreational markets in states that already have it, such as Colorado and Washington. Marijuana advocates called formation of the commission a delay tactic that would encourage Rhode Island residents to buy marijuana in Massachusetts, where rec sales are supposed to begin in the second ... Rhode Island to form recreational cannabis study commission is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2017-06-23
  • South Carolina Governor Signs Industrial Hemp Law
    By William Stash Jones Oregon Cannabis Connection   On Wednesday June 21, 2017, South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster signed the ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-23
  • Week in Review: Massachusetts rec logjam, Pennsylvania MMJ grower licensees & Oregon testing woes
    By Omar Sacirbey, Bart Schaneman and John Schroyer The Massachusetts House of Representatives proposes an overhaul to a voter-approved measure to legalize recreational cannabis, Pennsylvania awards 12 medical marijuana cultivation licenses, and Oregon continues to have MJ testing issues. Here’s a closer look at some notable developments in the marijuana industry over the past week. Massachusetts bill wrangling Massachusetts state senators and their counterparts in the House passed very different adult-use marijuana bills and now need to bridge their differences to forge a common measure that Gov. Charlie Baker must sign by July 1 for it to become law. ... Week in Review: Massachusetts rec logjam, Pennsylvania MMJ grower licensees & Oregon testing woes is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2017-06-23
  • At Church and State: The Cost of Senate Bill 1057
    By Anthony Taylor Oregon Cannabis Connection Anthony Taylor is the President of Compassionate Oregon and has unique access and insights ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-22
  • How THC Gets Into Your Brain, And How To Increase It!
    How much THC gets into our brain? How fast does it reach the brain? Can the blood-brain barrier stop THC? ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-22
  • How to Open an Oregon Recreational Grow Operation – Part 5: Canopy Sizes and Final Thoughts
    Today closes out our four part series on “How to Open an Oregon Recreational Grow Operation” (see parts 1, 2, 3, and 4) with a discussion on canopy sizes and the medical bump-up canopy program. I also touch on Oregon’s marijuana worker permit program and discuss what you can expect after you submit your OLCC (Oregon Liquor Control Commission) license application. Remember that the law in this area has been changing rapidly, so much of what we have discussed so far is potentially subject to change. Canopy Sizes. Your “canopy” is the part of your licensed premises that can be used to cultivate cannabis plants. In your cannabis license application you must tell the OLCC how much square footage you intend to use for cannabis cultivation, and you must clearly designate canopy areas on your site plan (see here for an example). The larger the total area, the greater your annual license fee: Micro Tier I – $1,000 Indoor: Up to 625 sq. ft. Outdoor: Up to 2,500 sq. ft. Micro Tier II – $2,000 Indoor: 626 to 1,250 sq. ft. Outdoor: 2,501 to 5,000 sq. ft. Tier I – $3,759 Indoor: 1,251 to 5,000 sq. ft. Outdoor: 5,001 to 10,000 sq. ft. Tier II – $5,750 Indoor: 5,001 to 10,000 sq. ft. Outdoor: 20,001 to 40,000 sq. ft. It gets a bit more complicated if you have a mixed use site, but generally one foot of indoor area is equivalent to four feet of outdoor area. So, for example, a mixed-use Tier II producer could have all 10,000 indoor, a mix of 5,000 indoor/20,000 outdoor, or all 40,000 outdoor. Your canopy areas do not have a height restriction, so feel free to expand vertically.When you are deciding on your cannabis canopy limits, keep in mind that the limits apply only to mature plants, not to immature plants. You can grow as many mature plants as you can fit in your canopy areas. As there are no height restrictions, you should be thinking vertically. Medical Bump-Up Canopy. Oregon’s legislature recently approved the “medical bump-up canopy” program, which allows recreational cannabis producers to set aside a small portion of their premises to cultivate medical cannabis. If you are interested in growing medical cannabis alongside your recreational cannabis, you can enter into a Producer-Patient Medical Canopy Agreement with up to 24 OMMP (Oregon Medical Marijuana Program) cardholding patients. These patients can reimburse you for your reasonable expenses, but you must give these patients their marijuana medicine free of charge. Nevertheless, a medical ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2017-06-21
  • Marijuana Smell Was Justification For Cop Who Murdered Philando Castille
    By Keith Mansur Oregon Cannabis Connection   In the murder case of Philando Castille, St. Anthony, Minnesota, police officer Jeronimo ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-21
  • 6 Stoner Essentials for the Summer of 2017
    Summer!  Yay!  One of my favorite times of year to enjoy weed outdoors with my friends.  I am not sure what I love the most…the backyard barbecues, the festivals, the street fairs, the outdoor concerts, the hiking, the swimming….I could go on! Regardless which one of those activities is your favorite, you can be certain [...] The post 6 Stoner Essentials for the Summer of 2017 appeared first on The Weed Blog. ... read more
    Source: The Weed BlogPublished on 2017-06-21
  • NM Health Secretary Blocks Adding Opioid Use and Dementia to Medical Marijuana Conditions
    By OCC Staff From Drug Policy Alliance   June 15, 2017 — Yesterday afternoon the Secretary of Health denied the ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-20
  • CBD Hemp Company Facing Fraud Charges
    From Hemp Today   For the second time in a year, a U.S.-based hemp firm has been hit with fraud ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-20
  • New Jersey Legalization Proposal Should Include Social Justice Revisions
    There was a hearing yesterday in the New Jersey State Legislature for SB (Senate Bill) 3195, which would legalize small amounts of marijuana for adults 21 and older.  This Bill is sponsored by Senator Nicholas Scutari (D-Union). While we are generally supportive of bills such as this, and have reported on New Jersey cannabis policy before, [...] The post New Jersey Legalization Proposal Should Include Social Justice Revisions appeared first on The Weed Blog. ... read more
    Source: The Weed BlogPublished on 2017-06-20
  • Oregon Cannabis Company Acquisitions, Part 2: Term Sheets
    Last week, I wrote on Oregon cannabis company acquisitions, and the types of deal structures these transactions tend to follow. I mentioned that before a transaction is consummated, but after discussions have commenced, the purchasing entity will typically discuss its plans with counsel. The lawyer will then draft a letter of intent or a term sheet to present to the target company. If the target company accepts outright, the transaction will proceed. If the target company does not accept outright (more common), it will submit proposed revisions. Term sheets take many forms, but in a basic sense a term sheet describes the terms of the acquisition at hand. Because each transaction is a snowflake, each term sheet is also unique and must be carefully considered and prepared. Sometimes, the parties will skip the term sheet and simply proceed to the transaction in an attempt at “efficiency.” We strongly advise against this: it invites a substantial risk of misunderstanding as to which documents will follow, and when, and may even cause confusion as to deal points themselves. Here is a basic list of items for inclusion in any term sheet for an Oregon cannabis company acquisition: Binding vs. non-binding provisions. As a general concept, a well written term sheet will be organized by binding and non-binding provisions. The binding provisions will include items like non-disclosure, exclusivity, jurisdiction, and choice of law. The non-binding provisions will include the unique deal point items, such as purchase price, payment terms and collateral agreements (e.g. consulting agreement, non-compete, lease or land sale contract, etc.). When a non-binding provision is misplaced into the “binding” category, or vice versa, both buyer and seller can expose themselves to serious legal risk. Nature of acquisition. The term sheet should clearly lay out whether the transaction is an asset sale, stock sale or merger, and whether the purchase price will be paid via cash, debt, equity swap, or other method. This portion of the document should also detail whether the buyer will proceed in its own name, or through a newly created entity. Liabilities. In nearly all acquisitions, the purchaser will assume certain liabilities of the seller. These liabilities may include everything under the sun related to seller, or liabilities may be limited to select items, like assignable contracts. If specific liabilities are known at term sheet preparation, they should be listed, perhaps on a separate schedule. Indemnification. Limitations on both seller and buyer liability can be a heavily negotiated portion of any term sheet. The term sheet should deal with any ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2017-06-20
  • Report: Tainted cannabis still evading Oregon testing process
    Despite strict efforts by Oregon regulators to keep pesticide-tainted marijuana from reaching store shelves, some contaminated cannabis is still slipping past the state’s testing labs. The Oregonian, the state’s largest newspaper, recently conducted a study to determine the success of Oregon’s testing program in halting the sale of tainted marijuana. The newspaper purchased a small sample of cannabis extracts from Portland marijuana stores and took the samples to two labs for two rounds of testing. In the first round, three of the 10 products contained higher levels of pesticide than the state allows. But when the samples ... Report: Tainted cannabis still evading Oregon testing process is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2017-06-19
  • Product Designer Goes from Mainstream Consulting to Cannabis Storage
    When product designer Ed Kilduff’s Kickstarter campaign earned him ninety thousand dollars, he asked his supporters what they used the product for. “After coffee and tea, the most popular use was for weed,” says Kilduff. His invention, EVAK—the smell-proof, glass storage container that vacuum seals—was perfect for storing cannabis, and his next idea was born. [...] The post Product Designer Goes from Mainstream Consulting to Cannabis Storage appeared first on The Weed Blog. ... read more
    Source: The Weed BlogPublished on 2017-06-19
 
  • Study: Adult Use Marijuana Laws Do Not Adversely Impact Traffic Fatality Rates
    By Paul Armentano From NORML   The enactment of statewide laws regulating the adult use and sale of cannabis is ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-23
  • Rhode Island to form recreational cannabis study commission
    Rhode Island’s Senate and House of Representatives voted to end their debate over recreational marijuana legalization bills and instead created a 19-person commission to study the issue. Among the commission’s mandates – after the Senate agreed Thursday with an earlier House vote to halt any MJ legislation – is the exploration of the recreational markets in states that already have it, such as Colorado and Washington. Marijuana advocates called formation of the commission a delay tactic that would encourage Rhode Island residents to buy marijuana in Massachusetts, where rec sales are supposed to begin in the second ... Rhode Island to form recreational cannabis study commission is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2017-06-23
  • South Carolina Governor Signs Industrial Hemp Law
    By William Stash Jones Oregon Cannabis Connection   On Wednesday June 21, 2017, South Carolina Governor Henry McMaster signed the ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-23
  • Week in Review: Massachusetts rec logjam, Pennsylvania MMJ grower licensees & Oregon testing woes
    By Omar Sacirbey, Bart Schaneman and John Schroyer The Massachusetts House of Representatives proposes an overhaul to a voter-approved measure to legalize recreational cannabis, Pennsylvania awards 12 medical marijuana cultivation licenses, and Oregon continues to have MJ testing issues. Here’s a closer look at some notable developments in the marijuana industry over the past week. Massachusetts bill wrangling Massachusetts state senators and their counterparts in the House passed very different adult-use marijuana bills and now need to bridge their differences to forge a common measure that Gov. Charlie Baker must sign by July 1 for it to become law. ... Week in Review: Massachusetts rec logjam, Pennsylvania MMJ grower licensees & Oregon testing woes is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2017-06-23
  • At Church and State: The Cost of Senate Bill 1057
    By Anthony Taylor Oregon Cannabis Connection Anthony Taylor is the President of Compassionate Oregon and has unique access and insights ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-22
  • How THC Gets Into Your Brain, And How To Increase It!
    How much THC gets into our brain? How fast does it reach the brain? Can the blood-brain barrier stop THC? ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-22
  • How to Open an Oregon Recreational Grow Operation – Part 5: Canopy Sizes and Final Thoughts
    Today closes out our four part series on “How to Open an Oregon Recreational Grow Operation” (see parts 1, 2, 3, and 4) with a discussion on canopy sizes and the medical bump-up canopy program. I also touch on Oregon’s marijuana worker permit program and discuss what you can expect after you submit your OLCC (Oregon Liquor Control Commission) license application. Remember that the law in this area has been changing rapidly, so much of what we have discussed so far is potentially subject to change. Canopy Sizes. Your “canopy” is the part of your licensed premises that can be used to cultivate cannabis plants. In your cannabis license application you must tell the OLCC how much square footage you intend to use for cannabis cultivation, and you must clearly designate canopy areas on your site plan (see here for an example). The larger the total area, the greater your annual license fee: Micro Tier I – $1,000 Indoor: Up to 625 sq. ft. Outdoor: Up to 2,500 sq. ft. Micro Tier II – $2,000 Indoor: 626 to 1,250 sq. ft. Outdoor: 2,501 to 5,000 sq. ft. Tier I – $3,759 Indoor: 1,251 to 5,000 sq. ft. Outdoor: 5,001 to 10,000 sq. ft. Tier II – $5,750 Indoor: 5,001 to 10,000 sq. ft. Outdoor: 20,001 to 40,000 sq. ft. It gets a bit more complicated if you have a mixed use site, but generally one foot of indoor area is equivalent to four feet of outdoor area. So, for example, a mixed-use Tier II producer could have all 10,000 indoor, a mix of 5,000 indoor/20,000 outdoor, or all 40,000 outdoor. Your canopy areas do not have a height restriction, so feel free to expand vertically.When you are deciding on your cannabis canopy limits, keep in mind that the limits apply only to mature plants, not to immature plants. You can grow as many mature plants as you can fit in your canopy areas. As there are no height restrictions, you should be thinking vertically. Medical Bump-Up Canopy. Oregon’s legislature recently approved the “medical bump-up canopy” program, which allows recreational cannabis producers to set aside a small portion of their premises to cultivate medical cannabis. If you are interested in growing medical cannabis alongside your recreational cannabis, you can enter into a Producer-Patient Medical Canopy Agreement with up to 24 OMMP (Oregon Medical Marijuana Program) cardholding patients. These patients can reimburse you for your reasonable expenses, but you must give these patients their marijuana medicine free of charge. Nevertheless, a medical ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2017-06-21
  • Marijuana Smell Was Justification For Cop Who Murdered Philando Castille
    By Keith Mansur Oregon Cannabis Connection   In the murder case of Philando Castille, St. Anthony, Minnesota, police officer Jeronimo ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-21
  • 6 Stoner Essentials for the Summer of 2017
    Summer!  Yay!  One of my favorite times of year to enjoy weed outdoors with my friends.  I am not sure what I love the most…the backyard barbecues, the festivals, the street fairs, the outdoor concerts, the hiking, the swimming….I could go on! Regardless which one of those activities is your favorite, you can be certain [...] The post 6 Stoner Essentials for the Summer of 2017 appeared first on The Weed Blog. ... read more
    Source: The Weed BlogPublished on 2017-06-21
  • NM Health Secretary Blocks Adding Opioid Use and Dementia to Medical Marijuana Conditions
    By OCC Staff From Drug Policy Alliance   June 15, 2017 — Yesterday afternoon the Secretary of Health denied the ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-20
  • CBD Hemp Company Facing Fraud Charges
    From Hemp Today   For the second time in a year, a U.S.-based hemp firm has been hit with fraud ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-06-20
  • New Jersey Legalization Proposal Should Include Social Justice Revisions
    There was a hearing yesterday in the New Jersey State Legislature for SB (Senate Bill) 3195, which would legalize small amounts of marijuana for adults 21 and older.  This Bill is sponsored by Senator Nicholas Scutari (D-Union). While we are generally supportive of bills such as this, and have reported on New Jersey cannabis policy before, [...] The post New Jersey Legalization Proposal Should Include Social Justice Revisions appeared first on The Weed Blog. ... read more
    Source: The Weed BlogPublished on 2017-06-20
  • Oregon Cannabis Company Acquisitions, Part 2: Term Sheets
    Last week, I wrote on Oregon cannabis company acquisitions, and the types of deal structures these transactions tend to follow. I mentioned that before a transaction is consummated, but after discussions have commenced, the purchasing entity will typically discuss its plans with counsel. The lawyer will then draft a letter of intent or a term sheet to present to the target company. If the target company accepts outright, the transaction will proceed. If the target company does not accept outright (more common), it will submit proposed revisions. Term sheets take many forms, but in a basic sense a term sheet describes the terms of the acquisition at hand. Because each transaction is a snowflake, each term sheet is also unique and must be carefully considered and prepared. Sometimes, the parties will skip the term sheet and simply proceed to the transaction in an attempt at “efficiency.” We strongly advise against this: it invites a substantial risk of misunderstanding as to which documents will follow, and when, and may even cause confusion as to deal points themselves. Here is a basic list of items for inclusion in any term sheet for an Oregon cannabis company acquisition: Binding vs. non-binding provisions. As a general concept, a well written term sheet will be organized by binding and non-binding provisions. The binding provisions will include items like non-disclosure, exclusivity, jurisdiction, and choice of law. The non-binding provisions will include the unique deal point items, such as purchase price, payment terms and collateral agreements (e.g. consulting agreement, non-compete, lease or land sale contract, etc.). When a non-binding provision is misplaced into the “binding” category, or vice versa, both buyer and seller can expose themselves to serious legal risk. Nature of acquisition. The term sheet should clearly lay out whether the transaction is an asset sale, stock sale or merger, and whether the purchase price will be paid via cash, debt, equity swap, or other method. This portion of the document should also detail whether the buyer will proceed in its own name, or through a newly created entity. Liabilities. In nearly all acquisitions, the purchaser will assume certain liabilities of the seller. These liabilities may include everything under the sun related to seller, or liabilities may be limited to select items, like assignable contracts. If specific liabilities are known at term sheet preparation, they should be listed, perhaps on a separate schedule. Indemnification. Limitations on both seller and buyer liability can be a heavily negotiated portion of any term sheet. The term sheet should deal with any ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2017-06-20
  • Report: Tainted cannabis still evading Oregon testing process
    Despite strict efforts by Oregon regulators to keep pesticide-tainted marijuana from reaching store shelves, some contaminated cannabis is still slipping past the state’s testing labs. The Oregonian, the state’s largest newspaper, recently conducted a study to determine the success of Oregon’s testing program in halting the sale of tainted marijuana. The newspaper purchased a small sample of cannabis extracts from Portland marijuana stores and took the samples to two labs for two rounds of testing. In the first round, three of the 10 products contained higher levels of pesticide than the state allows. But when the samples ... Report: Tainted cannabis still evading Oregon testing process is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2017-06-19
  • Product Designer Goes from Mainstream Consulting to Cannabis Storage
    When product designer Ed Kilduff’s Kickstarter campaign earned him ninety thousand dollars, he asked his supporters what they used the product for. “After coffee and tea, the most popular use was for weed,” says Kilduff. His invention, EVAK—the smell-proof, glass storage container that vacuum seals—was perfect for storing cannabis, and his next idea was born. [...] The post Product Designer Goes from Mainstream Consulting to Cannabis Storage appeared first on The Weed Blog. ... read more
    Source: The Weed BlogPublished on 2017-06-19

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