• Oregon credit union, tech firm to offer marijuana banking services
    Oregon-based Wauna Credit Union has forged a partnership with Arizona tech firm Hypur that will allow the financial institution to service marijuana-related companies. According to the Coast River Business Journal, the credit union believes the partnership will allow the institution to “become part of the solution and not part of the problem.” Hypur is providing […] Oregon credit union, tech firm to offer marijuana banking services is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2018-01-19
  • New Oregon Cannabis Rules: Part 3 – Canopy Size Changes
    The OLCC has made some changes to canopy sizes that seem to target outdoor growers.In the two previous entries in this series (here and here), we discussed the packet of rules amendments recently adopted by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (“OLCC”) to implement the many cannabis bills passed by Oregon last year. Specifically, we discussed a new rule allowing Marijuana Promotional Events, and a small amendment to the definition of “financial interest” that will have a big impact. Today we want to talk about some important changes to canopy sizes. Before discussing the specific changes, it is important to note that these rules amendments were adopted in an uncertain time in Oregon’s recreational market. As we have noted before, prices for outdoor flower appear to be falling quickly and many producers have contacted our office about the possibility of pushing the OLCC to limit producer licenses, or enact a moratorium on new licenses. (Note: As of January 8, there were 896 active producer licensees in Oregon, with about 1,000 more in the queue). The reality is that the OLCC does not have statutory authority to either limit licenses or enact a moratorium. Only the legislature can make this kind of change, and we think that it is unlikely that it will be considered in the upcoming short session. Unlimited licenses will be the law of the land for the foreseeable future. While the OLCC may not be able to limit licenses, it does have the authority to set canopy sizes, i.e. the size of the allowed cultivation area for each producer tier. Obviously, while existing producers may favor a moratorium on new licenses, they certainly don’t want a reduction in canopy sizes. From this point of view, the new rules are a bit of a mixed bag. Previously, the OLCC’s rules allowed for an unlimited number of immature plants on each grow site. The canopy areas designated for each producer were for mature plants only. For example, a micro-tier I producer could have up to 625 square feet of mature plants and an unlimited number of immature plants. Many outdoor grow operations maximize yield by ensuring that they have a constant supply of near-mature plants ready to replant in their canopy area after each harvest. The new rules will put a damper on this strategy. Specifically, the recent amendments create a new distinction between mature and immature canopies. Mature canopy sizes are identical to the previous rule, but can now contain both mature and immature plants. The new immature canopies ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-01-16
  • Oregon marijuana retailers busted in underage-sales sting
    Nearly 20% of state-licensed marijuana retailers in a recent undercover operation sold cannabis to underage buyers, according to Oregon authorities. The Oregon Liquor Control Commission told The Oregonian that 16 of 86 shops sold marijuana to people younger than 21 during decoy visits in December. The agency issued citations to the violating stores, which also […] Oregon marijuana retailers busted in underage-sales sting is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2018-01-15
  • Oregon Marijuana Retailers Fail OLCC Decoy Checks Across State
    January 10, 2018 – The Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) performed a series of decoy purchases at marijuana dispensaries across the The post Oregon Marijuana Retailers Fail OLCC Decoy Checks Across State appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-10
  • Oregon Cannabis: New Year, New Minimum Wage
    More for the workers, less for the boss.It’s 2018! That means your Oregon marijuana business will be subject to increased minimum wage requirements this summer. The new federal Tax Act has everyone considering money, so now is a great time to think about how the increase in state minimum wage will affect your business expenses. In 2015 the Oregon legislature established a progressive series of annual minimum wage rate increases. The rate increases began on July 1, 2016 and continue through July 1, 2022. On July 1, 2023 the minimum wage rate will be indexed to inflation based on the consumer price index, which is a figure published by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. The location of your Oregon cannabis business will dictate the amount of increase of the minimum wage for your non-exempt employees this July. (“Non-exempt employees” are employees who must be paid minimum wage and overtime, for any hours worked beyond 40 in a given week.) Date Standard Portland Metro Nonurban Counties July 1, 2016 $9.75 $9.75 $9.50 July 1, 2017 $10.25 $11.25 $10.00 July 1, 2018 $10.75 $12.00 $10.50 July 1, 2019 $11.25 $12.50 $11.00 July 1, 2020 $12.00 $13.25 $11.50 July 1, 2021 $12.75 $14.00 $12.00 July 1, 2022 $13.50 $14.75 $12.50 July 1, 2023 Adjusted annually based on the increase, if any, to the US City average Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers $1.25 over the standard minimum wage $1 less than the standard minimum wage The Portland Metro rate applies to all employers located within the urban growth boundary. Metro has an Urban Growth Boundary tool to help determine if your cannabis business is within the Portland Metro area. The nonurban counties rate applies to: Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Marrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, and Wheeler. All other counties must pay the standard rate. Both the state of Oregon and the federal government set minimum wage requirements. The federal minimum wage is and remains at $7.25. As you can tell, Oregon’s minimum wage is significantly higher than the federal minimum wage. When federal and state employment laws conflict, employers must apply whichever standard is most beneficial to employees. In the case of minimum wage, Oregon employers, including all cannabis businesses, must pay their employees minimum wage based on the Oregon rate. Start planning ahead. ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-01-09
  • New Oregon Cannabis Rules: Part Two – Lenders Must Be Disclosed
    Nearly all lenders must now be disclosed to the OLCCJust prior to the new year, we discussed the packet of rules amendments recently adopted by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission implementing the many cannabis bills signed by Oregon governor Kate Brown last year, and promised to dive in depth on a few of the more important changes. In the prior post we discussed new rules for “Marijuana Promotional Events.” This week we dig into a small but important change to the definition of “financial interest” that could have widespread effects on the Oregon cannabis industry: under the new rules, all lenders are pulled into the “financial interest” definition, and must be disclosed. Historically, the definition of financial interest has not included lenders at commercially reasonable rates. But the new amendments add the following to the definition of “financial interest”: “lending money, real property or personal property to an applicant or licensee for use in the business that constitutes a substantial portion of the business cost.” OAR 845-1015(23)(a)(B). The new rules make no attempt to define “substantial portion of the business cost,” which means that some day, someone may test that definition in administrative litigation. As a bit of background, the OLCC has always been interested in knowing the identity of each individual or entity that has a financial interest in a cannabis license. In the initial application process, applicants must disclose anyone with a financial interest in the company (in many cases, this includes spouses). The application can be denied if the interest holder has an issue that would justify denial if that person was an applicant, such as a (serious) criminal history. A licensee also has several notice requirements relating to anyone with a financial interest in the company: A licensee must notify the OLCC within 10 days if a financial interest holder has a change in contact information. A licensee must notify the OLCC within 24 hours if a financial interest holder is arrested or convicted of a misdemeanor or felony. Failing to do this can result in a license revocation. A licensee must submit a form to the OLCC and receive prior approval before making any change in who has a financial interest in the company. The OLCC has the right to reject the proposed change. Prior to the recent change, the definition of “financial interest” was already fairly broad: “an interest in [licensee] such that the performance of the [licensee] causes, or is capable of causing, an individual, or a legal entity with which the individual is affiliated, to benefit or ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-01-08
  • Compassionate Oregon Response to Cole Memo Decision by Sessions
    We received this press release from Compassionate Oregon in response to the Sessions Memo that was released on January 4th, The post Compassionate Oregon Response to Cole Memo Decision by Sessions appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-05
  • Oregon Cannabis Licenses: Change In Ownership
    We recently wrote that we are working on a substantial number of merger and acquisition deals regarding Oregon marijuana businesses. One question that comes up in these deals, without exception, is how the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) license acquisition process works for the incoming party. This is because licensing is a fundamental sale consideration: no economic activity will be allowed for the new ownership group until it receives state approval. Fortunately, when it comes to changes in ownership, OLCC works hard to expedite license turn-over. A very common misconception among Oregon buyers and sellers is that a party can buy, sell or transfer an existing pot license. This is not allowed. Instead, as we explained last February on this blog, whenever 51% or more of a business is bought or sold—whether through an asset purchase agreement or stock sale—OLCC requires the new ownership group to apply for, and obtain, a new license.  The good news here is that the purchaser need not start from scratch: when representing buyers, we typically reach out to OLCC’s lead licensing technician and let her know that a new application has been submitted. She will pull the application out of the queue, and pass it along to one of two OLCC “change-in-ownership” technicians. In our experience, these individuals usually take about two weeks to review the application materials, and another week or so to schedule an inspection. Assuming there are no issues with background checks or acquiring a replacement Land Use Compatibility Statement, OLCC will issue the new license and the buyer can begin to take on seller’s inventory. Typically, both the buyer’s and seller’s license are active for a day or two during the inventory transfer period. At this time, buyer presents an OLCC letter to METRC, and the parties put together a manifest to move everything over. After the inventory is fully transferred to buyer, the seller’s license is cancelled. You may be wondering: “where can I find any of this information on the OLCC website?” The answer is, “you can’t.” OLCC has undertaken quite a few changes to its licensing process in the past year (mostly, for the better), and not all information applicable to licensing is available online, or even stated in the administrative rules. Instead, the parties and their lawyers need to work closely with OLCC to facilitate the licensing process, and both buyer and seller should try to keep abreast of any changes in protocol. Finally, because the change-in-ownership licensing process takes three weeks or more, it is critical for the parties in ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-01-05
  • Attorney General Sessions Issues Memo Rescinding the Cole Memo
    January 4, 2018, 11:30am — The United states Department of Justice has officially released a memorandum that advises the many The post Attorney General Sessions Issues Memo Rescinding the Cole Memo appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-04
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions To Rescind the Cole Memo
    Obama era memo offered guidance on marijuana prosecutions. January 4, 2017 – United States Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions, a The post Attorney General Jeff Sessions To Rescind the Cole Memo appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-04
  • Ecological Alignment: The Best Environmental Choice
    Our goal at Green Source Gardens (GSG), a legal producer of cannabis, is to represent the most natural and ecologically The post Ecological Alignment: The Best Environmental Choice appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-03
  • Hawaii Gun Grab?
    Honolulu Police Try to Confiscate Cannabis Patients’ Guns but Backtrack The Honolulu Police Department (HPD) thought they were going to The post Hawaii Gun Grab? appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-02
  • New Oregon Cannabis Rules: Part One – Marijuana Promotional Events
    Change is the only constant in cannabis regulation.On December 22, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC)  adopted a large packet of rules amendments that incorporate the many cannabis bills signed by Oregon Governor Kate Brown this year, as well as “technical amendments [made] in response to market realities.” These changes, effective December 28, 2017, include: implementation of mandatory seed-to-sale tracking for medical cannabis; a new regulatory regime for hemp and hemp products that allows hemp products into Oregon’s recreational cannabis supply chain; new rules governing Marijuana Promotional Events; new canopy limits for growing immature plants outside of the standard canopy areas; an exception to the retailers-must-be-1,000-ft-from-a-school rule if there is a physical or geographical barrier between the retail site and the school that prevents children from traveling to the retailer, such as a river; new certifications for recreational wholesalers that can now trim cannabis, and can offer mobile for-hire trimming services; some minor changes to transportation rules; a small change to the definition of “financial interest” that will have a big impact on what investors must be pre-approved by the OLCC; a new prohibition on sales through walk-up windows to complement the existing prohibition on drive-thru sales (Makes you wonder who came up with the work-around that led to this rule change); and micro-tier producers can now do some processing of cannabis concentrates. Because the changes cover quite a bit of ground, we’ll dig into several of these in more detail in future installments in this series. For now, we will focus on the new Marijuana Promotional Events, governed by OAR 845-025-1335. This new administrative rule allows recreational licensees to display their products at trade shows, which is something many of our clients have been eager to do for a while. Under the new rules, trade shows or similar events will be organized by a single licensee or “Event Organizer”, that will be the primary contact with the OLCC. The Event Organizer must submit an application to the OLCC at least 28 days before the event that will include the names and signatures of any participating licensees, the amount and type of cannabis items that will be on display, and a control plan that explains how the participating licensees will prevent violations. Assuming the OLCC approves an application, the participating licensees may bring and display marijuana and marijuana products from their inventory (sorry, no hemp). All of the marijuana must be returned to the licensee’s premises at the end of the event. Thus, these trade shows are not an opportunity to sell or otherwise distribute any cannabis products. Even ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2017-12-31
  • At Church and State: The Oregon Cannabis Commission
    By Anthony Taylor Anthony Taylor is the President of Compassionate Oregon and has unique access and insights into Oregon’s lawmaking The post At Church and State: The Oregon Cannabis Commission appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-12-30
  • California Joins the Bonanza
    Prop 64 Recreational Sales Finally Effective January 1 After California’s passage of Proposition 64 in November of 2016—which paved the The post California Joins the Bonanza appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-12-29
 
  • Oregon credit union, tech firm to offer marijuana banking services
    Oregon-based Wauna Credit Union has forged a partnership with Arizona tech firm Hypur that will allow the financial institution to service marijuana-related companies. According to the Coast River Business Journal, the credit union believes the partnership will allow the institution to “become part of the solution and not part of the problem.” Hypur is providing […] Oregon credit union, tech firm to offer marijuana banking services is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2018-01-19
  • New Oregon Cannabis Rules: Part 3 – Canopy Size Changes
    The OLCC has made some changes to canopy sizes that seem to target outdoor growers.In the two previous entries in this series (here and here), we discussed the packet of rules amendments recently adopted by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (“OLCC”) to implement the many cannabis bills passed by Oregon last year. Specifically, we discussed a new rule allowing Marijuana Promotional Events, and a small amendment to the definition of “financial interest” that will have a big impact. Today we want to talk about some important changes to canopy sizes. Before discussing the specific changes, it is important to note that these rules amendments were adopted in an uncertain time in Oregon’s recreational market. As we have noted before, prices for outdoor flower appear to be falling quickly and many producers have contacted our office about the possibility of pushing the OLCC to limit producer licenses, or enact a moratorium on new licenses. (Note: As of January 8, there were 896 active producer licensees in Oregon, with about 1,000 more in the queue). The reality is that the OLCC does not have statutory authority to either limit licenses or enact a moratorium. Only the legislature can make this kind of change, and we think that it is unlikely that it will be considered in the upcoming short session. Unlimited licenses will be the law of the land for the foreseeable future. While the OLCC may not be able to limit licenses, it does have the authority to set canopy sizes, i.e. the size of the allowed cultivation area for each producer tier. Obviously, while existing producers may favor a moratorium on new licenses, they certainly don’t want a reduction in canopy sizes. From this point of view, the new rules are a bit of a mixed bag. Previously, the OLCC’s rules allowed for an unlimited number of immature plants on each grow site. The canopy areas designated for each producer were for mature plants only. For example, a micro-tier I producer could have up to 625 square feet of mature plants and an unlimited number of immature plants. Many outdoor grow operations maximize yield by ensuring that they have a constant supply of near-mature plants ready to replant in their canopy area after each harvest. The new rules will put a damper on this strategy. Specifically, the recent amendments create a new distinction between mature and immature canopies. Mature canopy sizes are identical to the previous rule, but can now contain both mature and immature plants. The new immature canopies ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-01-16
  • Oregon marijuana retailers busted in underage-sales sting
    Nearly 20% of state-licensed marijuana retailers in a recent undercover operation sold cannabis to underage buyers, according to Oregon authorities. The Oregon Liquor Control Commission told The Oregonian that 16 of 86 shops sold marijuana to people younger than 21 during decoy visits in December. The agency issued citations to the violating stores, which also […] Oregon marijuana retailers busted in underage-sales sting is a post from: Marijuana Business Daily: Financial, Legal & Cannabusiness news for cannabis entrepreneurs ... read more
    Source: MMJ Business DailyPublished on 2018-01-15
  • Oregon Marijuana Retailers Fail OLCC Decoy Checks Across State
    January 10, 2018 – The Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) performed a series of decoy purchases at marijuana dispensaries across the The post Oregon Marijuana Retailers Fail OLCC Decoy Checks Across State appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-10
  • Oregon Cannabis: New Year, New Minimum Wage
    More for the workers, less for the boss.It’s 2018! That means your Oregon marijuana business will be subject to increased minimum wage requirements this summer. The new federal Tax Act has everyone considering money, so now is a great time to think about how the increase in state minimum wage will affect your business expenses. In 2015 the Oregon legislature established a progressive series of annual minimum wage rate increases. The rate increases began on July 1, 2016 and continue through July 1, 2022. On July 1, 2023 the minimum wage rate will be indexed to inflation based on the consumer price index, which is a figure published by the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics. The location of your Oregon cannabis business will dictate the amount of increase of the minimum wage for your non-exempt employees this July. (“Non-exempt employees” are employees who must be paid minimum wage and overtime, for any hours worked beyond 40 in a given week.) Date Standard Portland Metro Nonurban Counties July 1, 2016 $9.75 $9.75 $9.50 July 1, 2017 $10.25 $11.25 $10.00 July 1, 2018 $10.75 $12.00 $10.50 July 1, 2019 $11.25 $12.50 $11.00 July 1, 2020 $12.00 $13.25 $11.50 July 1, 2021 $12.75 $14.00 $12.00 July 1, 2022 $13.50 $14.75 $12.50 July 1, 2023 Adjusted annually based on the increase, if any, to the US City average Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers $1.25 over the standard minimum wage $1 less than the standard minimum wage The Portland Metro rate applies to all employers located within the urban growth boundary. Metro has an Urban Growth Boundary tool to help determine if your cannabis business is within the Portland Metro area. The nonurban counties rate applies to: Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Jefferson, Klamath, Lake, Malheur, Marrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa, and Wheeler. All other counties must pay the standard rate. Both the state of Oregon and the federal government set minimum wage requirements. The federal minimum wage is and remains at $7.25. As you can tell, Oregon’s minimum wage is significantly higher than the federal minimum wage. When federal and state employment laws conflict, employers must apply whichever standard is most beneficial to employees. In the case of minimum wage, Oregon employers, including all cannabis businesses, must pay their employees minimum wage based on the Oregon rate. Start planning ahead. ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-01-09
  • New Oregon Cannabis Rules: Part Two – Lenders Must Be Disclosed
    Nearly all lenders must now be disclosed to the OLCCJust prior to the new year, we discussed the packet of rules amendments recently adopted by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission implementing the many cannabis bills signed by Oregon governor Kate Brown last year, and promised to dive in depth on a few of the more important changes. In the prior post we discussed new rules for “Marijuana Promotional Events.” This week we dig into a small but important change to the definition of “financial interest” that could have widespread effects on the Oregon cannabis industry: under the new rules, all lenders are pulled into the “financial interest” definition, and must be disclosed. Historically, the definition of financial interest has not included lenders at commercially reasonable rates. But the new amendments add the following to the definition of “financial interest”: “lending money, real property or personal property to an applicant or licensee for use in the business that constitutes a substantial portion of the business cost.” OAR 845-1015(23)(a)(B). The new rules make no attempt to define “substantial portion of the business cost,” which means that some day, someone may test that definition in administrative litigation. As a bit of background, the OLCC has always been interested in knowing the identity of each individual or entity that has a financial interest in a cannabis license. In the initial application process, applicants must disclose anyone with a financial interest in the company (in many cases, this includes spouses). The application can be denied if the interest holder has an issue that would justify denial if that person was an applicant, such as a (serious) criminal history. A licensee also has several notice requirements relating to anyone with a financial interest in the company: A licensee must notify the OLCC within 10 days if a financial interest holder has a change in contact information. A licensee must notify the OLCC within 24 hours if a financial interest holder is arrested or convicted of a misdemeanor or felony. Failing to do this can result in a license revocation. A licensee must submit a form to the OLCC and receive prior approval before making any change in who has a financial interest in the company. The OLCC has the right to reject the proposed change. Prior to the recent change, the definition of “financial interest” was already fairly broad: “an interest in [licensee] such that the performance of the [licensee] causes, or is capable of causing, an individual, or a legal entity with which the individual is affiliated, to benefit or ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-01-08
  • Compassionate Oregon Response to Cole Memo Decision by Sessions
    We received this press release from Compassionate Oregon in response to the Sessions Memo that was released on January 4th, The post Compassionate Oregon Response to Cole Memo Decision by Sessions appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-05
  • Oregon Cannabis Licenses: Change In Ownership
    We recently wrote that we are working on a substantial number of merger and acquisition deals regarding Oregon marijuana businesses. One question that comes up in these deals, without exception, is how the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) license acquisition process works for the incoming party. This is because licensing is a fundamental sale consideration: no economic activity will be allowed for the new ownership group until it receives state approval. Fortunately, when it comes to changes in ownership, OLCC works hard to expedite license turn-over. A very common misconception among Oregon buyers and sellers is that a party can buy, sell or transfer an existing pot license. This is not allowed. Instead, as we explained last February on this blog, whenever 51% or more of a business is bought or sold—whether through an asset purchase agreement or stock sale—OLCC requires the new ownership group to apply for, and obtain, a new license.  The good news here is that the purchaser need not start from scratch: when representing buyers, we typically reach out to OLCC’s lead licensing technician and let her know that a new application has been submitted. She will pull the application out of the queue, and pass it along to one of two OLCC “change-in-ownership” technicians. In our experience, these individuals usually take about two weeks to review the application materials, and another week or so to schedule an inspection. Assuming there are no issues with background checks or acquiring a replacement Land Use Compatibility Statement, OLCC will issue the new license and the buyer can begin to take on seller’s inventory. Typically, both the buyer’s and seller’s license are active for a day or two during the inventory transfer period. At this time, buyer presents an OLCC letter to METRC, and the parties put together a manifest to move everything over. After the inventory is fully transferred to buyer, the seller’s license is cancelled. You may be wondering: “where can I find any of this information on the OLCC website?” The answer is, “you can’t.” OLCC has undertaken quite a few changes to its licensing process in the past year (mostly, for the better), and not all information applicable to licensing is available online, or even stated in the administrative rules. Instead, the parties and their lawyers need to work closely with OLCC to facilitate the licensing process, and both buyer and seller should try to keep abreast of any changes in protocol. Finally, because the change-in-ownership licensing process takes three weeks or more, it is critical for the parties in ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-01-05
  • Attorney General Sessions Issues Memo Rescinding the Cole Memo
    January 4, 2018, 11:30am — The United states Department of Justice has officially released a memorandum that advises the many The post Attorney General Sessions Issues Memo Rescinding the Cole Memo appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-04
  • Attorney General Jeff Sessions To Rescind the Cole Memo
    Obama era memo offered guidance on marijuana prosecutions. January 4, 2017 – United States Attorney General Jefferson Beauregard Sessions, a The post Attorney General Jeff Sessions To Rescind the Cole Memo appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-04
  • Ecological Alignment: The Best Environmental Choice
    Our goal at Green Source Gardens (GSG), a legal producer of cannabis, is to represent the most natural and ecologically The post Ecological Alignment: The Best Environmental Choice appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-03
  • Hawaii Gun Grab?
    Honolulu Police Try to Confiscate Cannabis Patients’ Guns but Backtrack The Honolulu Police Department (HPD) thought they were going to The post Hawaii Gun Grab? appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-01-02
  • New Oregon Cannabis Rules: Part One – Marijuana Promotional Events
    Change is the only constant in cannabis regulation.On December 22, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC)  adopted a large packet of rules amendments that incorporate the many cannabis bills signed by Oregon Governor Kate Brown this year, as well as “technical amendments [made] in response to market realities.” These changes, effective December 28, 2017, include: implementation of mandatory seed-to-sale tracking for medical cannabis; a new regulatory regime for hemp and hemp products that allows hemp products into Oregon’s recreational cannabis supply chain; new rules governing Marijuana Promotional Events; new canopy limits for growing immature plants outside of the standard canopy areas; an exception to the retailers-must-be-1,000-ft-from-a-school rule if there is a physical or geographical barrier between the retail site and the school that prevents children from traveling to the retailer, such as a river; new certifications for recreational wholesalers that can now trim cannabis, and can offer mobile for-hire trimming services; some minor changes to transportation rules; a small change to the definition of “financial interest” that will have a big impact on what investors must be pre-approved by the OLCC; a new prohibition on sales through walk-up windows to complement the existing prohibition on drive-thru sales (Makes you wonder who came up with the work-around that led to this rule change); and micro-tier producers can now do some processing of cannabis concentrates. Because the changes cover quite a bit of ground, we’ll dig into several of these in more detail in future installments in this series. For now, we will focus on the new Marijuana Promotional Events, governed by OAR 845-025-1335. This new administrative rule allows recreational licensees to display their products at trade shows, which is something many of our clients have been eager to do for a while. Under the new rules, trade shows or similar events will be organized by a single licensee or “Event Organizer”, that will be the primary contact with the OLCC. The Event Organizer must submit an application to the OLCC at least 28 days before the event that will include the names and signatures of any participating licensees, the amount and type of cannabis items that will be on display, and a control plan that explains how the participating licensees will prevent violations. Assuming the OLCC approves an application, the participating licensees may bring and display marijuana and marijuana products from their inventory (sorry, no hemp). All of the marijuana must be returned to the licensee’s premises at the end of the event. Thus, these trade shows are not an opportunity to sell or otherwise distribute any cannabis products. Even ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2017-12-31
  • At Church and State: The Oregon Cannabis Commission
    By Anthony Taylor Anthony Taylor is the President of Compassionate Oregon and has unique access and insights into Oregon’s lawmaking The post At Church and State: The Oregon Cannabis Commission appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-12-30
  • California Joins the Bonanza
    Prop 64 Recreational Sales Finally Effective January 1 After California’s passage of Proposition 64 in November of 2016—which paved the The post California Joins the Bonanza appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2017-12-29