• Study Finds Long-Term Heavy Cannabis Use May Impair Driving
    Long-term, heavy cannabis use might be making adults bad drivers. Especially, according to a new study in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, if drivers started consuming cannabis in their early teens. Researchers studying the impacts of recreational cannabis consumption on cognitive function say bad driving behaviors like speeding, ignoring traffic signals, and getting into accidents could stem from heavy adolescent cannabis use. Furthermore, researchers found that long-term cannabis users drove badly whether or not they were under the influence of THC. Bad Driving is a Downstream Effect of Adolescent Cannabis Use, Study Says Dr. Staci Gruber is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the Director of the Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Core at McLean Hospital’s Brain Imaging Center. She’s an expert in the ways that substance use among adults and adolescents affects the brain, and her recent work looks at how cannabis affects cognitive ability and brain development. Her latest study, “Recreational cannabis use impairs driving performance in the absence of acute intoxication,” presents a new perspective on the relationship between cannabis and traffic safety. No, this isn’t a study showing how being high makes you a bad driver. In fact, many studies that have looked into driving under the influence of THC have found that being high doesn’t have much of an impact on driving ability. In some cases, being high actually made drivers more cautious. Similarly, researchers have been unable to link expanding legal access to cannabis to any uptick in traffic accidents caused by drivers who were high behind the wheel. Instead, Dr. Gruber’s new study is about how long-term heavy cannabis use impairs cognition, making complex cognitive tasks like driving more difficult. The study’s findings, published Tuesday, resonate with other studies linking adolescent substance use to diminished cognitive performance later in life. Consuming mind-altering substances like alcohol and cannabis appear to disrupt the brain’s development at a crucial stage. Those disruptions lead to a range of cognitive and psychiatric problems down the line, not just bad driving. “Prior to age 16, the brain is especially neurodevelopmentally vulnerable, not just to cannabis but to other drugs, alcohol, illness, injury,” said Gruber. “The brain is really under construction.” Weed Can Make You a Bad Driver if You Consumed Heavily in Your Teens To determine how adolescent cannabis use impaired driving ability later on in life, it was important for Dr. Gruber to assess driving performance in non-intoxicated cannabis users who consumed cannabis on a daily or near daily basis. For the ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-14
  • Workers Will Vote Today On Joining Illinois’ First Cannabis Union
    Organized labor in the Illinois cannabis world could enter into a new era today. In Joliet, 100 employees at Cresco Labs will vote on whether they will join the United Food and Commercial Workers. Should the yeses outnumber the nos, they will be the first workplace in the state to organize.  Legal recreational cannabis sales started in the state on January 2, and $3.2 million worth of product was moved by stores on the first day. Though those sales numbers did not remain entirely consistent, demand has been so high that many dispensaries have run out of product. There are estimates that the cannabis industry will ring up $2 to $3 billion dollars, accounting for some 65,000 jobs.  That’s a lot of wealth to be generated, and many have expressed concerns that cannabis industry profits won’t be appropriately distributed to companies’ employees.  “We worked to get ourselves into the bill because cannabis jobs can be a career for people,” said Zach Koutsky, legislative and political director for UFCW Local 881 to local news site Chicago Business. “We think we can provide pensions and union-provided health care.” Political leaders of color have sounded the alarm over the whiteness of the leadership at companies that have been thus far selected for cannabis business licenses in places like Chicago. But in some ways, Illinois is leading when it comes to racial and economic justice measures in the structuring of its cannabis regulations. The city government in Evanstown has linked cannabis tax revenues to a reparations fund for its Black community.  Like California before it, Illinois has opted to require labor peace agreements, which can ease management-labor relations by discouraging strikes and management interference during organizing drives. Such agreements were declared mandatory in California in 2017 and the state has been the site of multiple successful cannabis labor organizing drives since.  Cannabis represents a big opportunity for the labor movement, which has struggled in recent decades in the United States. The importance of the Joliet vote did not go unnoticed by progressive leaders outside of Illinois. “Workers in the cannabis industry deserve respect and fair wages. I encourage Cresco Labs workers in Joliet to vote yes for the union on Tuesday,” tweeted presidential hopeful Senator Bernie Sanders. 
    Workers in the cannabis industry deserve respect and fair wages. I encourage Cresco Labs workers in Joliet to vote yes for the union on Tuesday. As president, I will lead the fight to double union membership in this country. https://t.co/NwOeNNh9aZ— Bernie Sanders (@BernieSanders) January ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-14
  • Despite Support, Recreational Marijuana Will Not Appear on Florida Ballot
    Voters in Florida will have to wait at least two more years before they get the opportunity to decide whether the state should legalize pot.  Make it Legal Florida, the group that spearheaded the campaign to get the proposed amendment on the 2020 ballot, said this week that it is tabling the effort, with an eye toward 2020. “With the support of over 67 percent of Florida voters, Make it Legal Florida is proud to have gathered more than 700,000 signed petitions in the effort to bring adult-use cannabis to the Sunshine State,” the group said in a statement, as reported by local TV station WFLA. “The narrow timeframe to submit and verify those signatures has prompted our committee to shift focus to now gain ballot access in 2022.” In November, Make it Legal Florida announced that it had rounded up 313,000 signatures, though none were certified. The group had until early next month to get 766,200 certified signatures. “We are overwhelmed by the support the Make it Legal Florida effort has received around the state from Florida voters who believe adults should have access to regulated cannabis products,” the group’s chairman Nick Hansen said at the time. “We are continuing to deliver signatures for validation, and we are confident we will meet the deadline for Florida’s 2020 ballot.” Other efforts to get a legalization proposal on this year’s Florida ballot have likewise gone up in smoke. What Could Have Been If the Make it Legal campaign had materialized, Florida could have joined 11 other states—most recently Illinois—to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Other states could follow suit this year. Voters in South Dakota will decide on an amendment to legalize recreational pot in November. The state’s ballot will include a separate proposal to legalize medical marijuana.  Last week, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo called for his state to legalize recreational pot for adults 21 and over. The failed effort in Florida is a setback for advocates who believed the state was ready to embrace legalization. A poll from Quinnipiac University in June found that 65 percent of Florida voters supported allowing adults to possess small amounts of pot for personal use—an all-time high in the state. More than 70 percent of Florida voters approved a measure in 2016 to legalize medical marijuana. The post Despite Support, Recreational Marijuana Will Not Appear on Florida Ballot appeared first on High Times. ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-14
  • The 5 Best Soils for Growing Weed
    If growing cannabis is an art, then the soil is the canvas, paint and even a little bit of the brush. As your “grow medium” (the material that your plants grow in), the balance of nutrients your soil contains shapes how your plants grow, how fast and abundantly they flower and how many buds they yield.  Cannabis plants spring up like a literal weed. But growing weed optimally — in a way that allows it to express its best traits and produce trichome-rich flowers — demands care, attention to detail and a bit of trial-and-error. At the same time, there's no better way to develop a closer, more connected and more rewarding relationship with cannabis than growing some yourself. To get you started, here's our list of the five best soils for healthy weed.  Fox Farm's Happy Frog Potting Soil Fox Farm's specialized line of soils for cannabis are some of the most widely acclaimed grow mediums available. If you're beginning your grow journey from the ground up, Happy Frog is an excellent soil to nurture seeds and seedlings.  Designed for indoor and outdoor cultivation, Happy Frog potting soil takes care of young cannabis plants' essential needs, from correct pH levels to balanced nutrients, including a vital combination of microbes and fungi from earthworm castings and forest humus.  Nature's Living Soil Organic Super Soil From planting seeds to harvesting buds, Nature's Living Soil's Organic Super Soil has you covered through cannabis' entire grow cycle. Reviewers love the ready-to-use simplicity this soil provides: just plant, water and wait. For those growing on their own for the first time, this is one of the best soils you can buy.  If you're digging through the literature on growing weed, you've probably seen the term “super soil” come up quite a bit. Coined by the legendary grower and seed producer Subcool, the term generally describes a neutral organic soil base that's been enhanced with a comprehensive range of “amendments,” i.e., added nutrients and microorganisms. Using a super soil eliminates the need for liquid nutrients as your cannabis plants grow. Red's Premium Biochar-Based Soil Red's Premium is another all-in-one, ready-to-use soil blend. But what makes it one of the best soils for weed is its stand-out feature: biochar. Biochar is an amendment that excels at ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-14
  • California Governor Proposes Changes to Cannabis Regulations and Taxes
    California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) unveiled his annual budget proposal on Jan. 10, 2020, and it contains several provisions aimed at simplifying and streamlining regulations for the marijuana industry. The biggest proposed change concerns the state's cannabis licensing system, which Newsom hopes to consolidate into one agency — the Department of Cannabis Control — rather than the three that are currently in charge of approving marijuana businesses. “Establishment of a standalone department with an enforcement arm will centralize and align critical areas to build a successful legal cannabis market, by creating a single point of contact for cannabis licensees and local governments,” the administration said in a summary. Under the current system, the Bureau of Cannabis Control, the Department of Food and Agriculture and the Department of Public Health each have licensing responsibilities. Another area that will be of particular interest for stakeholders is the governor's plan for changes to marijuana taxes. The purpose of the proposed reforms is “simplifying cannabis tax administration by changing the point of collection.” The administration wants to “move the responsibility for the cultivation excise tax from the final distributor to the first, and for the retail excise tax from the distributor to the retailer.” Doing so would allow businesses to avoid a requirement to “estimate product mark-up and set wholesale tax rates” and therefore simplify both the industry's tax burden as well as the collection process. Other changes to cannabis taxation may be on the horizon, as the notice states that Newsom will be meeting with stakeholders to discuss other issues such as amending the number of taxes and the tax rate in order to “support a stronger, safer legal cannabis market.” Finally, the governor's budget describes allocation of tax revenue from marijuana sales. After funding implementation costs and research and actions related to resolving the past harms of prohibition, his office estimates it will have more than $332 million in revenue to distribute to other social services. That will go toward education and prevention for youth substance use disorders and school retention ($199.7 million), clean-up and enforcement efforts connected to environmental damages from illicit marijuana cultivation ($66.6 million) and “public safety-related activities” ($66.6 million). These allocations were unchanged from the previous year. Lindsay Robinson, executive director of the California Cannabis Industry Association (CCIA), said in a statement to Marijuana Moment that her group “has been strongly advocating for the streamlining of business operations for cannabis operators ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Austin Politician Proposes Ban on Using Government Funds for THC Testing
    When Texas legalized hemp last year, it threw the state’s marijuana policing into some kind of chaos. All of a sudden, officers were largely left without proper testing technology to determine if suspects’ leafy greens possessed a THC percentage above the legal cutoff of 0.3 percent. As a result, law enforcement authorities across the state began to throw up their hands and throw out low-level possession cases. In the state’s capital, that trending away from marijuana possession policing may soon be turned into official policy. Austin City Council member Greg Casar has filed a draft resolution that would prohibit city cops from using government money to test for THC percentages.  The plan would also instruct the police department to deprioritize cannabis misdemeanor cases unless there is a safety threat involved.  “Frankly, we’re trying to maintain what’s happening right now, which is that [marijuana] citations are going nowhere,” Casar told the Texas Observer. “Why would we go back to a world where these citations go somewhere?” In addition to the resources needed for THC testing procedures, the city has long struggled with the racially biased nature of its cannabis policing. Nearly half of all marijuana possession citations issued by the Austin police in 2019 went to Latino residents, who make up only 34.3 percent of the city’s population according to the most recent Census numbers.  Between the passage of the hemp law on June 10th of last year and September, the Travis County attorney’s office declined to move forward on some 170 marijuana-related charges, a “cite and release” policy that echoes state-wide trends.  The Austin Police Department reportedly does have one machine that is capable of testing cannabis THC levels. But city politicians have already voiced concerns over additional taxpayer dollars being spent on marijuana testing and policing in general.  Travis County Justice of the Peace Nicholas Chu told a local news site last fall that he did not believe that officers’ time was best spent pursuing marijuana offenders.  “If you look at the whole reason behind the cite-and-release process to begin with … it was created so law enforcement wouldn’t be wasting their time on low-level nonviolent misdemeanor offenses,” he said. “And also wasting people’s time in terms of worrying about these cases when law enforcement can be focused on more important, serious violent offenses.” The Future of Cannabis in Texas Perhaps the most pertinent question is, why hasn’t Texas pulled the trigger on marijuana legalization altogether? In fact, even the state’s Republican Party has had decriminalization in its platform ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Proposed Law Update Has Some Hemp Farmers Nervous
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hemp growers and entrepreneurs who were joyous a year ago after U.S. lawmakers reclassified the plant as a legal agricultural crop now are worried their businesses could be crippled if federal policymakers move ahead with draft regulations. Licenses for hemp cultivation topped a half-million acres (200,000 hectares) last year, more than 450% above 2018 levels, so there’s intense interest in the rules the U.S. government is creating. Critical comments on the draft have poured in from hemp farmers, processors, retailers and state governments. Growers are concerned the government wants to use a heavy hand that could result in many crops failing required tests and being destroyed. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the agency writing the rules, estimates 20% of hemp lots would fail under the proposed regulations. “Their business is to support farmers — and not punish farmers — and the rules as they’re written right now punish farmers,” said Dove Oldham, who last year grew an acre (0.40 hectares) of hemp on her family farm in Grants Pass. “There’s just a lot of confusion, and people are just looking for leadership.” The USDA did not respond to the criticism but has taken the unusual step of extending the public comment period by a month, until Jan. 29. The agency told The Associated Press it will analyze information from this year’s growing season before releasing its final rules, which would take effect in 2021. Agricultural officials in states that run pilot hemp cultivation programs under an earlier federal provision are weighing in with formal letters to the USDA. “There are 46 states where hemp is legal, and I’m going to say that every single state has raised concerns to us about something within the rule. They might be coming from different perspectives, but every state has raised concerns,” said Aline DeLucia, director of public policy for the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. Testing for THC in Hemp Most of the anxiety involves how the federal government plans to test for THC, the high-inducing compound found in marijuana and hemp, both cannabis plants. The federal government and most states consider plants with tiny amounts — 0.3% or less — to be hemp. Anything above that is marijuana and illegal under federal law. Yet another cannabis compound has fueled the explosion in hemp cultivation. Cannabidiol, or CBD, is marketed as a health and wellness aid and infused in everything from food and drinks to lotions, toothpaste and pet treats. Many have credited CBD with helping ease ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Proposed Law Update Has Some Hemp Farmers Nervous
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hemp growers and entrepreneurs who were joyous a year ago after U.S. lawmakers reclassified the plant as a legal agricultural crop now are worried their businesses could be crippled if federal policymakers move ahead with draft regulations. Licenses for hemp cultivation topped a half-million acres (200,000 hectares) last year, more than 450% above 2018 levels, so there’s intense interest in the rules the U.S. government is creating. Critical comments on the draft have poured in from hemp farmers, processors, retailers and state governments. Growers are concerned the government wants to use a heavy hand that could result in many crops failing required tests and being destroyed. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the agency writing the rules, estimates 20% of hemp lots would fail under the proposed regulations. “Their business is to support farmers — and not punish farmers — and the rules as they’re written right now punish farmers,” said Dove Oldham, who last year grew an acre (0.40 hectares) of hemp on her family farm in Grants Pass. “There’s just a lot of confusion, and people are just looking for leadership.” The USDA did not respond to the criticism but has taken the unusual step of extending the public comment period by a month, until Jan. 29. The agency told The Associated Press it will analyze information from this year’s growing season before releasing its final rules, which would take effect in 2021. Agricultural officials in states that run pilot hemp cultivation programs under an earlier federal provision are weighing in with formal letters to the USDA. “There are 46 states where hemp is legal, and I’m going to say that every single state has raised concerns to us about something within the rule. They might be coming from different perspectives, but every state has raised concerns,” said Aline DeLucia, director of public policy for the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. Testing for THC in Hemp Most of the anxiety involves how the federal government plans to test for THC, the high-inducing compound found in marijuana and hemp, both cannabis plants. The federal government and most states consider plants with tiny amounts — 0.3% or less — to be hemp. Anything above that is marijuana and illegal under federal law. Yet another cannabis compound has fueled the explosion in hemp cultivation. Cannabidiol, or CBD, is marketed as a health and wellness aid and infused in everything from food and drinks to lotions, toothpaste and pet treats. Many have credited CBD with helping ease ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Australian Capital’s Cannabis Laws Present Confusion and Controversy
    Possession and home cultivation of cannabis become legal in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) at the end of the month, but a lack of provisions to establish an approved marijuana supply chain likely means the area’s illicit market will continue unabated. The ACT, home to Canberra, Australia’s national capital, passed measures in June that make it the first of the country’s jurisdictions to legalize cannabis for personal use. Under the laws that go into effect on January 31, adults in the ACT will be permitted to possess up to 50 grams of dried cannabis or 150 grams of fresh marijuana. Using cannabis will be permitted in private homes but not in public or in the presence of children. Home cultivation of up to two cannabis plants per adult or four per household will also be legalized, although hydroponic gardening will not be allowed. Plants that are in public view or accessible to children are also not permitted. Limited Sources of Legal Weed But no allowances for the sale or commercial cultivation of cannabis were written into the laws. No dispensaries will be opening and gifts of cannabis from one adult to another remain against the law. Even the sale of cannabis seeds will still be illegal. The ACT government has said that the laws are focused on “harm minimization” and are not intended to legitimize the distribution of cannabis. “This approach seeks to ensure that adults who are in possession of cannabis do not have to face the prospect of criminal penalty for possession and are more easily able to seek help for addiction or treatment for the adverse effects of cannabis,” a government spokesperson said. “It is not the Government’s intention to legalize the gifting of cannabis between individuals, other acts of supply, or the commercial sale of cannabis.” Professor Simon Lenton of the National Drug Research Institute at Curtin University in Perth said the new laws will leave most cannabis users with no choice other than continuing to buy their marijuana through the illicit market. “Either they’re going to go to the illegal market or they’re going to miss out,” he said. “It really is a problem for how the majority of people in the ACT who smoke cannabis are going to access the cannabis.” Lenton added that the legalization of cannabis clubs, which were considered by lawmakers while legalization was being drafted but failed to gain approval, would help alleviate the problem of legal supply. Under the social club model, up to 10 adults could pool their ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Australian Capital’s Cannabis Laws Present Confusion and Controversy
    Possession and home cultivation of cannabis become legal in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) at the end of the month, but a lack of provisions to establish an approved marijuana supply chain likely means the area’s illicit market will continue unabated. The ACT, home to Canberra, Australia’s national capital, passed measures in June that make it the first of the country’s jurisdictions to legalize cannabis for personal use. Under the laws that go into effect on January 31, adults in the ACT will be permitted to possess up to 50 grams of dried cannabis or 150 grams of fresh marijuana. Using cannabis will be permitted in private homes but not in public or in the presence of children. Home cultivation of up to two cannabis plants per adult or four per household will also be legalized, although hydroponic gardening will not be allowed. Plants that are in public view or accessible to children are also not permitted. Limited Sources of Legal Weed But no allowances for the sale or commercial cultivation of cannabis were written into the laws. No dispensaries will be opening and gifts of cannabis from one adult to another remain against the law. Even the sale of cannabis seeds will still be illegal. The ACT government has said that the laws are focused on “harm minimization” and are not intended to legitimize the distribution of cannabis. “This approach seeks to ensure that adults who are in possession of cannabis do not have to face the prospect of criminal penalty for possession and are more easily able to seek help for addiction or treatment for the adverse effects of cannabis,” a government spokesperson said. “It is not the Government’s intention to legalize the gifting of cannabis between individuals, other acts of supply, or the commercial sale of cannabis.” Professor Simon Lenton of the National Drug Research Institute at Curtin University in Perth said the new laws will leave most cannabis users with no choice other than continuing to buy their marijuana through the illicit market. “Either they’re going to go to the illegal market or they’re going to miss out,” he said. “It really is a problem for how the majority of people in the ACT who smoke cannabis are going to access the cannabis.” Lenton added that the legalization of cannabis clubs, which were considered by lawmakers while legalization was being drafted but failed to gain approval, would help alleviate the problem of legal supply. Under the social club model, up to 10 adults could pool their ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • High Times Greats: Howard Stern On Drugs
    Though Howard Stern claims to no longer smoke pot and use other illegal drugs, they have always been a favorite subject of his. In 1993, he devoted radio airtime to such pothead guests as David Lee Roth, Richard Belzer, Chip Z’Nuff of Enuff Z’Nuff and Phil Rind of Sacred Reich. Marijuana minstrel David Peel and Mickey “The Pope of Dope” Cezar were longtime Stern regulars. Private Parts, the shock-jock’s bestselling biography, was written with the help of former High Times editor-in-chief Larry “Ratso” Sloman. For the April, 1994 edition of High Times, Steve Bloom compiled a series of blurbs that illustrate Howard Stern’s progressive stance on drugs. In honor of Stern’s birthday January 12, we’re republishing them below. On The Radio November 29, 1990Guests: Mickey “The Pope of Dope” Cezar and David Peel Cezar: There are people out there suffering, people who are dying who need grass. The government says no. What kind of government is this who doesn’t give a good goddamn what happens to its citizens? To support some laws that to me are unconstitutional, inhuman and unjust…Stern: So you actually distribute the pot to them free?Cezar: Some of them, yes. If they can afford, they can pay. If you can’t, well…Stern: Wow. You really are the Pope. Quickly, I’ll say hello to David Peel. Do you sell marijuana like the Pope?Peel: I don’t sell it, I sing it.Stern: Do you wanna sing a song?Peel [sings]: Free the Pope, free the Pope/ The Pope smokes dope/ God gave him the grass/ The Pope smokes dope…Stern: I gotta get outta here…. After Cezar and Peel leave and a commercial break. Stern: Remember that song? Mari-marijuana, mari-marijuana/ We like marijuana, you like marijuana, everyone likes marijuana too/ Up against the wall, motherf-er…. Remember that one?Jackie Martling: That was the big hit!Stern: David Peel wrote that, right?Martling: I know he sang it for years and years on the same street corner. April 19, 1993Guest: David Lee Roth Stern: I know that good pot is four hundred dollars an ounce. So for ten dollars you probably just got a joint!Roth: It’s the most creative ten dollars I ever spent!Stern: Hey, normally when you buy ten dollars’ worth of pot you don’t have to do anything, but now all of a sudden that it’s David Lee Roth they could make a whole big deal out of it and really bust his balls for a couple of years.Roth: Guys, I’m outta here. Have a really good day.Stern: Didn’t it sound like he ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • High Times Greats: Howard Stern On Drugs
    Though Howard Stern claims to no longer smoke pot and use other illegal drugs, they have always been a favorite subject of his. In 1993, he devoted radio airtime to such pothead guests as David Lee Roth, Richard Belzer, Chip Z’Nuff of Enuff Z’Nuff and Phil Rind of Sacred Reich. Marijuana minstrel David Peel and Mickey “The Pope of Dope” Cezar were longtime Stern regulars. Private Parts, the shock-jock’s bestselling biography, was written with the help of former High Times editor-in-chief Larry “Ratso” Sloman. For the April, 1994 edition of High Times, Steve Bloom compiled a series of blurbs that illustrate Howard Stern’s progressive stance on drugs. In honor of Stern’s birthday January 12, we’re republishing them below. On The Radio November 29, 1990Guests: Mickey “The Pope of Dope” Cezar and David Peel Cezar: There are people out there suffering, people who are dying who need grass. The government says no. What kind of government is this who doesn’t give a good goddamn what happens to its citizens? To support some laws that to me are unconstitutional, inhuman and unjust…Stern: So you actually distribute the pot to them free?Cezar: Some of them, yes. If they can afford, they can pay. If you can’t, well…Stern: Wow. You really are the Pope. Quickly, I’ll say hello to David Peel. Do you sell marijuana like the Pope?Peel: I don’t sell it, I sing it.Stern: Do you wanna sing a song?Peel [sings]: Free the Pope, free the Pope/ The Pope smokes dope/ God gave him the grass/ The Pope smokes dope…Stern: I gotta get outta here…. After Cezar and Peel leave and a commercial break. Stern: Remember that song? Mari-marijuana, mari-marijuana/ We like marijuana, you like marijuana, everyone likes marijuana too/ Up against the wall, motherf-er…. Remember that one?Jackie Martling: That was the big hit!Stern: David Peel wrote that, right?Martling: I know he sang it for years and years on the same street corner. April 19, 1993Guest: David Lee Roth Stern: I know that good pot is four hundred dollars an ounce. So for ten dollars you probably just got a joint!Roth: It’s the most creative ten dollars I ever spent!Stern: Hey, normally when you buy ten dollars’ worth of pot you don’t have to do anything, but now all of a sudden that it’s David Lee Roth they could make a whole big deal out of it and really bust his balls for a couple of years.Roth: Guys, I’m outta here. Have a really good day.Stern: Didn’t it sound like he ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Study: Legalizing Medical Marijuana Makes People Have More Sex
    Legalizing medical marijuana appears to encourage people to have more sex, according to a recent study. “We find that [medical marijuana laws] cause an increase in sexual activity,” researchers from the University of Connecticut and Georgia State University concluded. That's not the only related effect, however, as the study also determined that there's a decrease in the use of contraceptives and an increase in the number of births following the enactment of medical cannabis policies. To determine how such laws influence how often people have sex, the team of researchers analyzed a large data set that included “detailed questions about sexual activity and substance use” in young people between 1997 and 2011. The survey asked respondents explicitly about past-month marijuana use and sex frequency. The analysis found a 4.3% increase in the “likelihood of having sex once or more in the past month” after a medical cannabis law was enacted and “an increase in sex beginning directly after the law change.” “The primary change in sexual behavior we observe is increased engagement in sexual activity,” researchers wrote.  Additionally, the effect of medical marijuana laws on births translates to a 2% increase, or 684 more births per quarter, “for all women of childbearing range.” “These results provide evidence that marijuana use has a considerable, unintended, and positive effect on birthrates,” the authors wrote in the paper, which was published late last month in the Journal of Health Economics. When it comes to contraceptives, the researchers highlight that the sensory effects of cannabis “may change attitudes toward sexual risks by making users less concerned about the consequences of intercourse, resulting in decreased contraceptive use.” Such behavioral changes could explain why birthrates increase when people have access to medical cannabis, despite what the study authors described as physiological effects associated with marijuana use that could decrease fertility. “Our findings on births suggest that behavioral factors can counteract the physiological changes from marijuana use that tend to decrease fertility,” they wrote. “We find that passage of [medical marijuana laws] result in both increased engagement in sexual activity and decreases in contraceptive use conditional on being sexually active,” the study concludes. “Jointly, both mechanisms suggest that behavioral responses may be due to increased attention to the immediate hedonic effects of sexual contact, increased willingness to engage in sex, as well as delayed discounting and ignoring ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-10
  • Test -post
    asdfjaklsdfklasdl a;lksdjflkajsdf The post Test -post appeared first on Weedmaps News. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-10
  • Auto Draft
    The post Auto Draft appeared first on Weedmaps News. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-10
 
  • Study Finds Long-Term Heavy Cannabis Use May Impair Driving
    Long-term, heavy cannabis use might be making adults bad drivers. Especially, according to a new study in Drug and Alcohol Dependence, if drivers started consuming cannabis in their early teens. Researchers studying the impacts of recreational cannabis consumption on cognitive function say bad driving behaviors like speeding, ignoring traffic signals, and getting into accidents could stem from heavy adolescent cannabis use. Furthermore, researchers found that long-term cannabis users drove badly whether or not they were under the influence of THC. Bad Driving is a Downstream Effect of Adolescent Cannabis Use, Study Says Dr. Staci Gruber is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the Director of the Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Core at McLean Hospital’s Brain Imaging Center. She’s an expert in the ways that substance use among adults and adolescents affects the brain, and her recent work looks at how cannabis affects cognitive ability and brain development. Her latest study, “Recreational cannabis use impairs driving performance in the absence of acute intoxication,” presents a new perspective on the relationship between cannabis and traffic safety. No, this isn’t a study showing how being high makes you a bad driver. In fact, many studies that have looked into driving under the influence of THC have found that being high doesn’t have much of an impact on driving ability. In some cases, being high actually made drivers more cautious. Similarly, researchers have been unable to link expanding legal access to cannabis to any uptick in traffic accidents caused by drivers who were high behind the wheel. Instead, Dr. Gruber’s new study is about how long-term heavy cannabis use impairs cognition, making complex cognitive tasks like driving more difficult. The study’s findings, published Tuesday, resonate with other studies linking adolescent substance use to diminished cognitive performance later in life. Consuming mind-altering substances like alcohol and cannabis appear to disrupt the brain’s development at a crucial stage. Those disruptions lead to a range of cognitive and psychiatric problems down the line, not just bad driving. “Prior to age 16, the brain is especially neurodevelopmentally vulnerable, not just to cannabis but to other drugs, alcohol, illness, injury,” said Gruber. “The brain is really under construction.” Weed Can Make You a Bad Driver if You Consumed Heavily in Your Teens To determine how adolescent cannabis use impaired driving ability later on in life, it was important for Dr. Gruber to assess driving performance in non-intoxicated cannabis users who consumed cannabis on a daily or near daily basis. For the ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-14
  • Workers Will Vote Today On Joining Illinois’ First Cannabis Union
    Organized labor in the Illinois cannabis world could enter into a new era today. In Joliet, 100 employees at Cresco Labs will vote on whether they will join the United Food and Commercial Workers. Should the yeses outnumber the nos, they will be the first workplace in the state to organize.  Legal recreational cannabis sales started in the state on January 2, and $3.2 million worth of product was moved by stores on the first day. Though those sales numbers did not remain entirely consistent, demand has been so high that many dispensaries have run out of product. There are estimates that the cannabis industry will ring up $2 to $3 billion dollars, accounting for some 65,000 jobs.  That’s a lot of wealth to be generated, and many have expressed concerns that cannabis industry profits won’t be appropriately distributed to companies’ employees.  “We worked to get ourselves into the bill because cannabis jobs can be a career for people,” said Zach Koutsky, legislative and political director for UFCW Local 881 to local news site Chicago Business. “We think we can provide pensions and union-provided health care.” Political leaders of color have sounded the alarm over the whiteness of the leadership at companies that have been thus far selected for cannabis business licenses in places like Chicago. But in some ways, Illinois is leading when it comes to racial and economic justice measures in the structuring of its cannabis regulations. The city government in Evanstown has linked cannabis tax revenues to a reparations fund for its Black community.  Like California before it, Illinois has opted to require labor peace agreements, which can ease management-labor relations by discouraging strikes and management interference during organizing drives. Such agreements were declared mandatory in California in 2017 and the state has been the site of multiple successful cannabis labor organizing drives since.  Cannabis represents a big opportunity for the labor movement, which has struggled in recent decades in the United States. The importance of the Joliet vote did not go unnoticed by progressive leaders outside of Illinois. “Workers in the cannabis industry deserve respect and fair wages. I encourage Cresco Labs workers in Joliet to vote yes for the union on Tuesday,” tweeted presidential hopeful Senator Bernie Sanders. 
    Workers in the cannabis industry deserve respect and fair wages. I encourage Cresco Labs workers in Joliet to vote yes for the union on Tuesday. As president, I will lead the fight to double union membership in this country. https://t.co/NwOeNNh9aZ— Bernie Sanders (@BernieSanders) January ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-14
  • Despite Support, Recreational Marijuana Will Not Appear on Florida Ballot
    Voters in Florida will have to wait at least two more years before they get the opportunity to decide whether the state should legalize pot.  Make it Legal Florida, the group that spearheaded the campaign to get the proposed amendment on the 2020 ballot, said this week that it is tabling the effort, with an eye toward 2020. “With the support of over 67 percent of Florida voters, Make it Legal Florida is proud to have gathered more than 700,000 signed petitions in the effort to bring adult-use cannabis to the Sunshine State,” the group said in a statement, as reported by local TV station WFLA. “The narrow timeframe to submit and verify those signatures has prompted our committee to shift focus to now gain ballot access in 2022.” In November, Make it Legal Florida announced that it had rounded up 313,000 signatures, though none were certified. The group had until early next month to get 766,200 certified signatures. “We are overwhelmed by the support the Make it Legal Florida effort has received around the state from Florida voters who believe adults should have access to regulated cannabis products,” the group’s chairman Nick Hansen said at the time. “We are continuing to deliver signatures for validation, and we are confident we will meet the deadline for Florida’s 2020 ballot.” Other efforts to get a legalization proposal on this year’s Florida ballot have likewise gone up in smoke. What Could Have Been If the Make it Legal campaign had materialized, Florida could have joined 11 other states—most recently Illinois—to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Other states could follow suit this year. Voters in South Dakota will decide on an amendment to legalize recreational pot in November. The state’s ballot will include a separate proposal to legalize medical marijuana.  Last week, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo called for his state to legalize recreational pot for adults 21 and over. The failed effort in Florida is a setback for advocates who believed the state was ready to embrace legalization. A poll from Quinnipiac University in June found that 65 percent of Florida voters supported allowing adults to possess small amounts of pot for personal use—an all-time high in the state. More than 70 percent of Florida voters approved a measure in 2016 to legalize medical marijuana. The post Despite Support, Recreational Marijuana Will Not Appear on Florida Ballot appeared first on High Times. ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-14
  • The 5 Best Soils for Growing Weed
    If growing cannabis is an art, then the soil is the canvas, paint and even a little bit of the brush. As your “grow medium” (the material that your plants grow in), the balance of nutrients your soil contains shapes how your plants grow, how fast and abundantly they flower and how many buds they yield.  Cannabis plants spring up like a literal weed. But growing weed optimally — in a way that allows it to express its best traits and produce trichome-rich flowers — demands care, attention to detail and a bit of trial-and-error. At the same time, there's no better way to develop a closer, more connected and more rewarding relationship with cannabis than growing some yourself. To get you started, here's our list of the five best soils for healthy weed.  Fox Farm's Happy Frog Potting Soil Fox Farm's specialized line of soils for cannabis are some of the most widely acclaimed grow mediums available. If you're beginning your grow journey from the ground up, Happy Frog is an excellent soil to nurture seeds and seedlings.  Designed for indoor and outdoor cultivation, Happy Frog potting soil takes care of young cannabis plants' essential needs, from correct pH levels to balanced nutrients, including a vital combination of microbes and fungi from earthworm castings and forest humus.  Nature's Living Soil Organic Super Soil From planting seeds to harvesting buds, Nature's Living Soil's Organic Super Soil has you covered through cannabis' entire grow cycle. Reviewers love the ready-to-use simplicity this soil provides: just plant, water and wait. For those growing on their own for the first time, this is one of the best soils you can buy.  If you're digging through the literature on growing weed, you've probably seen the term “super soil” come up quite a bit. Coined by the legendary grower and seed producer Subcool, the term generally describes a neutral organic soil base that's been enhanced with a comprehensive range of “amendments,” i.e., added nutrients and microorganisms. Using a super soil eliminates the need for liquid nutrients as your cannabis plants grow. Red's Premium Biochar-Based Soil Red's Premium is another all-in-one, ready-to-use soil blend. But what makes it one of the best soils for weed is its stand-out feature: biochar. Biochar is an amendment that excels at ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-14
  • California Governor Proposes Changes to Cannabis Regulations and Taxes
    California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) unveiled his annual budget proposal on Jan. 10, 2020, and it contains several provisions aimed at simplifying and streamlining regulations for the marijuana industry. The biggest proposed change concerns the state's cannabis licensing system, which Newsom hopes to consolidate into one agency — the Department of Cannabis Control — rather than the three that are currently in charge of approving marijuana businesses. “Establishment of a standalone department with an enforcement arm will centralize and align critical areas to build a successful legal cannabis market, by creating a single point of contact for cannabis licensees and local governments,” the administration said in a summary. Under the current system, the Bureau of Cannabis Control, the Department of Food and Agriculture and the Department of Public Health each have licensing responsibilities. Another area that will be of particular interest for stakeholders is the governor's plan for changes to marijuana taxes. The purpose of the proposed reforms is “simplifying cannabis tax administration by changing the point of collection.” The administration wants to “move the responsibility for the cultivation excise tax from the final distributor to the first, and for the retail excise tax from the distributor to the retailer.” Doing so would allow businesses to avoid a requirement to “estimate product mark-up and set wholesale tax rates” and therefore simplify both the industry's tax burden as well as the collection process. Other changes to cannabis taxation may be on the horizon, as the notice states that Newsom will be meeting with stakeholders to discuss other issues such as amending the number of taxes and the tax rate in order to “support a stronger, safer legal cannabis market.” Finally, the governor's budget describes allocation of tax revenue from marijuana sales. After funding implementation costs and research and actions related to resolving the past harms of prohibition, his office estimates it will have more than $332 million in revenue to distribute to other social services. That will go toward education and prevention for youth substance use disorders and school retention ($199.7 million), clean-up and enforcement efforts connected to environmental damages from illicit marijuana cultivation ($66.6 million) and “public safety-related activities” ($66.6 million). These allocations were unchanged from the previous year. Lindsay Robinson, executive director of the California Cannabis Industry Association (CCIA), said in a statement to Marijuana Moment that her group “has been strongly advocating for the streamlining of business operations for cannabis operators ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Austin Politician Proposes Ban on Using Government Funds for THC Testing
    When Texas legalized hemp last year, it threw the state’s marijuana policing into some kind of chaos. All of a sudden, officers were largely left without proper testing technology to determine if suspects’ leafy greens possessed a THC percentage above the legal cutoff of 0.3 percent. As a result, law enforcement authorities across the state began to throw up their hands and throw out low-level possession cases. In the state’s capital, that trending away from marijuana possession policing may soon be turned into official policy. Austin City Council member Greg Casar has filed a draft resolution that would prohibit city cops from using government money to test for THC percentages.  The plan would also instruct the police department to deprioritize cannabis misdemeanor cases unless there is a safety threat involved.  “Frankly, we’re trying to maintain what’s happening right now, which is that [marijuana] citations are going nowhere,” Casar told the Texas Observer. “Why would we go back to a world where these citations go somewhere?” In addition to the resources needed for THC testing procedures, the city has long struggled with the racially biased nature of its cannabis policing. Nearly half of all marijuana possession citations issued by the Austin police in 2019 went to Latino residents, who make up only 34.3 percent of the city’s population according to the most recent Census numbers.  Between the passage of the hemp law on June 10th of last year and September, the Travis County attorney’s office declined to move forward on some 170 marijuana-related charges, a “cite and release” policy that echoes state-wide trends.  The Austin Police Department reportedly does have one machine that is capable of testing cannabis THC levels. But city politicians have already voiced concerns over additional taxpayer dollars being spent on marijuana testing and policing in general.  Travis County Justice of the Peace Nicholas Chu told a local news site last fall that he did not believe that officers’ time was best spent pursuing marijuana offenders.  “If you look at the whole reason behind the cite-and-release process to begin with … it was created so law enforcement wouldn’t be wasting their time on low-level nonviolent misdemeanor offenses,” he said. “And also wasting people’s time in terms of worrying about these cases when law enforcement can be focused on more important, serious violent offenses.” The Future of Cannabis in Texas Perhaps the most pertinent question is, why hasn’t Texas pulled the trigger on marijuana legalization altogether? In fact, even the state’s Republican Party has had decriminalization in its platform ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Proposed Law Update Has Some Hemp Farmers Nervous
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hemp growers and entrepreneurs who were joyous a year ago after U.S. lawmakers reclassified the plant as a legal agricultural crop now are worried their businesses could be crippled if federal policymakers move ahead with draft regulations. Licenses for hemp cultivation topped a half-million acres (200,000 hectares) last year, more than 450% above 2018 levels, so there’s intense interest in the rules the U.S. government is creating. Critical comments on the draft have poured in from hemp farmers, processors, retailers and state governments. Growers are concerned the government wants to use a heavy hand that could result in many crops failing required tests and being destroyed. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the agency writing the rules, estimates 20% of hemp lots would fail under the proposed regulations. “Their business is to support farmers — and not punish farmers — and the rules as they’re written right now punish farmers,” said Dove Oldham, who last year grew an acre (0.40 hectares) of hemp on her family farm in Grants Pass. “There’s just a lot of confusion, and people are just looking for leadership.” The USDA did not respond to the criticism but has taken the unusual step of extending the public comment period by a month, until Jan. 29. The agency told The Associated Press it will analyze information from this year’s growing season before releasing its final rules, which would take effect in 2021. Agricultural officials in states that run pilot hemp cultivation programs under an earlier federal provision are weighing in with formal letters to the USDA. “There are 46 states where hemp is legal, and I’m going to say that every single state has raised concerns to us about something within the rule. They might be coming from different perspectives, but every state has raised concerns,” said Aline DeLucia, director of public policy for the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. Testing for THC in Hemp Most of the anxiety involves how the federal government plans to test for THC, the high-inducing compound found in marijuana and hemp, both cannabis plants. The federal government and most states consider plants with tiny amounts — 0.3% or less — to be hemp. Anything above that is marijuana and illegal under federal law. Yet another cannabis compound has fueled the explosion in hemp cultivation. Cannabidiol, or CBD, is marketed as a health and wellness aid and infused in everything from food and drinks to lotions, toothpaste and pet treats. Many have credited CBD with helping ease ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Proposed Law Update Has Some Hemp Farmers Nervous
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Hemp growers and entrepreneurs who were joyous a year ago after U.S. lawmakers reclassified the plant as a legal agricultural crop now are worried their businesses could be crippled if federal policymakers move ahead with draft regulations. Licenses for hemp cultivation topped a half-million acres (200,000 hectares) last year, more than 450% above 2018 levels, so there’s intense interest in the rules the U.S. government is creating. Critical comments on the draft have poured in from hemp farmers, processors, retailers and state governments. Growers are concerned the government wants to use a heavy hand that could result in many crops failing required tests and being destroyed. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the agency writing the rules, estimates 20% of hemp lots would fail under the proposed regulations. “Their business is to support farmers — and not punish farmers — and the rules as they’re written right now punish farmers,” said Dove Oldham, who last year grew an acre (0.40 hectares) of hemp on her family farm in Grants Pass. “There’s just a lot of confusion, and people are just looking for leadership.” The USDA did not respond to the criticism but has taken the unusual step of extending the public comment period by a month, until Jan. 29. The agency told The Associated Press it will analyze information from this year’s growing season before releasing its final rules, which would take effect in 2021. Agricultural officials in states that run pilot hemp cultivation programs under an earlier federal provision are weighing in with formal letters to the USDA. “There are 46 states where hemp is legal, and I’m going to say that every single state has raised concerns to us about something within the rule. They might be coming from different perspectives, but every state has raised concerns,” said Aline DeLucia, director of public policy for the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture. Testing for THC in Hemp Most of the anxiety involves how the federal government plans to test for THC, the high-inducing compound found in marijuana and hemp, both cannabis plants. The federal government and most states consider plants with tiny amounts — 0.3% or less — to be hemp. Anything above that is marijuana and illegal under federal law. Yet another cannabis compound has fueled the explosion in hemp cultivation. Cannabidiol, or CBD, is marketed as a health and wellness aid and infused in everything from food and drinks to lotions, toothpaste and pet treats. Many have credited CBD with helping ease ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Australian Capital’s Cannabis Laws Present Confusion and Controversy
    Possession and home cultivation of cannabis become legal in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) at the end of the month, but a lack of provisions to establish an approved marijuana supply chain likely means the area’s illicit market will continue unabated. The ACT, home to Canberra, Australia’s national capital, passed measures in June that make it the first of the country’s jurisdictions to legalize cannabis for personal use. Under the laws that go into effect on January 31, adults in the ACT will be permitted to possess up to 50 grams of dried cannabis or 150 grams of fresh marijuana. Using cannabis will be permitted in private homes but not in public or in the presence of children. Home cultivation of up to two cannabis plants per adult or four per household will also be legalized, although hydroponic gardening will not be allowed. Plants that are in public view or accessible to children are also not permitted. Limited Sources of Legal Weed But no allowances for the sale or commercial cultivation of cannabis were written into the laws. No dispensaries will be opening and gifts of cannabis from one adult to another remain against the law. Even the sale of cannabis seeds will still be illegal. The ACT government has said that the laws are focused on “harm minimization” and are not intended to legitimize the distribution of cannabis. “This approach seeks to ensure that adults who are in possession of cannabis do not have to face the prospect of criminal penalty for possession and are more easily able to seek help for addiction or treatment for the adverse effects of cannabis,” a government spokesperson said. “It is not the Government’s intention to legalize the gifting of cannabis between individuals, other acts of supply, or the commercial sale of cannabis.” Professor Simon Lenton of the National Drug Research Institute at Curtin University in Perth said the new laws will leave most cannabis users with no choice other than continuing to buy their marijuana through the illicit market. “Either they’re going to go to the illegal market or they’re going to miss out,” he said. “It really is a problem for how the majority of people in the ACT who smoke cannabis are going to access the cannabis.” Lenton added that the legalization of cannabis clubs, which were considered by lawmakers while legalization was being drafted but failed to gain approval, would help alleviate the problem of legal supply. Under the social club model, up to 10 adults could pool their ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Australian Capital’s Cannabis Laws Present Confusion and Controversy
    Possession and home cultivation of cannabis become legal in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT) at the end of the month, but a lack of provisions to establish an approved marijuana supply chain likely means the area’s illicit market will continue unabated. The ACT, home to Canberra, Australia’s national capital, passed measures in June that make it the first of the country’s jurisdictions to legalize cannabis for personal use. Under the laws that go into effect on January 31, adults in the ACT will be permitted to possess up to 50 grams of dried cannabis or 150 grams of fresh marijuana. Using cannabis will be permitted in private homes but not in public or in the presence of children. Home cultivation of up to two cannabis plants per adult or four per household will also be legalized, although hydroponic gardening will not be allowed. Plants that are in public view or accessible to children are also not permitted. Limited Sources of Legal Weed But no allowances for the sale or commercial cultivation of cannabis were written into the laws. No dispensaries will be opening and gifts of cannabis from one adult to another remain against the law. Even the sale of cannabis seeds will still be illegal. The ACT government has said that the laws are focused on “harm minimization” and are not intended to legitimize the distribution of cannabis. “This approach seeks to ensure that adults who are in possession of cannabis do not have to face the prospect of criminal penalty for possession and are more easily able to seek help for addiction or treatment for the adverse effects of cannabis,” a government spokesperson said. “It is not the Government’s intention to legalize the gifting of cannabis between individuals, other acts of supply, or the commercial sale of cannabis.” Professor Simon Lenton of the National Drug Research Institute at Curtin University in Perth said the new laws will leave most cannabis users with no choice other than continuing to buy their marijuana through the illicit market. “Either they’re going to go to the illegal market or they’re going to miss out,” he said. “It really is a problem for how the majority of people in the ACT who smoke cannabis are going to access the cannabis.” Lenton added that the legalization of cannabis clubs, which were considered by lawmakers while legalization was being drafted but failed to gain approval, would help alleviate the problem of legal supply. Under the social club model, up to 10 adults could pool their ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • High Times Greats: Howard Stern On Drugs
    Though Howard Stern claims to no longer smoke pot and use other illegal drugs, they have always been a favorite subject of his. In 1993, he devoted radio airtime to such pothead guests as David Lee Roth, Richard Belzer, Chip Z’Nuff of Enuff Z’Nuff and Phil Rind of Sacred Reich. Marijuana minstrel David Peel and Mickey “The Pope of Dope” Cezar were longtime Stern regulars. Private Parts, the shock-jock’s bestselling biography, was written with the help of former High Times editor-in-chief Larry “Ratso” Sloman. For the April, 1994 edition of High Times, Steve Bloom compiled a series of blurbs that illustrate Howard Stern’s progressive stance on drugs. In honor of Stern’s birthday January 12, we’re republishing them below. On The Radio November 29, 1990Guests: Mickey “The Pope of Dope” Cezar and David Peel Cezar: There are people out there suffering, people who are dying who need grass. The government says no. What kind of government is this who doesn’t give a good goddamn what happens to its citizens? To support some laws that to me are unconstitutional, inhuman and unjust…Stern: So you actually distribute the pot to them free?Cezar: Some of them, yes. If they can afford, they can pay. If you can’t, well…Stern: Wow. You really are the Pope. Quickly, I’ll say hello to David Peel. Do you sell marijuana like the Pope?Peel: I don’t sell it, I sing it.Stern: Do you wanna sing a song?Peel [sings]: Free the Pope, free the Pope/ The Pope smokes dope/ God gave him the grass/ The Pope smokes dope…Stern: I gotta get outta here…. After Cezar and Peel leave and a commercial break. Stern: Remember that song? Mari-marijuana, mari-marijuana/ We like marijuana, you like marijuana, everyone likes marijuana too/ Up against the wall, motherf-er…. Remember that one?Jackie Martling: That was the big hit!Stern: David Peel wrote that, right?Martling: I know he sang it for years and years on the same street corner. April 19, 1993Guest: David Lee Roth Stern: I know that good pot is four hundred dollars an ounce. So for ten dollars you probably just got a joint!Roth: It’s the most creative ten dollars I ever spent!Stern: Hey, normally when you buy ten dollars’ worth of pot you don’t have to do anything, but now all of a sudden that it’s David Lee Roth they could make a whole big deal out of it and really bust his balls for a couple of years.Roth: Guys, I’m outta here. Have a really good day.Stern: Didn’t it sound like he ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • High Times Greats: Howard Stern On Drugs
    Though Howard Stern claims to no longer smoke pot and use other illegal drugs, they have always been a favorite subject of his. In 1993, he devoted radio airtime to such pothead guests as David Lee Roth, Richard Belzer, Chip Z’Nuff of Enuff Z’Nuff and Phil Rind of Sacred Reich. Marijuana minstrel David Peel and Mickey “The Pope of Dope” Cezar were longtime Stern regulars. Private Parts, the shock-jock’s bestselling biography, was written with the help of former High Times editor-in-chief Larry “Ratso” Sloman. For the April, 1994 edition of High Times, Steve Bloom compiled a series of blurbs that illustrate Howard Stern’s progressive stance on drugs. In honor of Stern’s birthday January 12, we’re republishing them below. On The Radio November 29, 1990Guests: Mickey “The Pope of Dope” Cezar and David Peel Cezar: There are people out there suffering, people who are dying who need grass. The government says no. What kind of government is this who doesn’t give a good goddamn what happens to its citizens? To support some laws that to me are unconstitutional, inhuman and unjust…Stern: So you actually distribute the pot to them free?Cezar: Some of them, yes. If they can afford, they can pay. If you can’t, well…Stern: Wow. You really are the Pope. Quickly, I’ll say hello to David Peel. Do you sell marijuana like the Pope?Peel: I don’t sell it, I sing it.Stern: Do you wanna sing a song?Peel [sings]: Free the Pope, free the Pope/ The Pope smokes dope/ God gave him the grass/ The Pope smokes dope…Stern: I gotta get outta here…. After Cezar and Peel leave and a commercial break. Stern: Remember that song? Mari-marijuana, mari-marijuana/ We like marijuana, you like marijuana, everyone likes marijuana too/ Up against the wall, motherf-er…. Remember that one?Jackie Martling: That was the big hit!Stern: David Peel wrote that, right?Martling: I know he sang it for years and years on the same street corner. April 19, 1993Guest: David Lee Roth Stern: I know that good pot is four hundred dollars an ounce. So for ten dollars you probably just got a joint!Roth: It’s the most creative ten dollars I ever spent!Stern: Hey, normally when you buy ten dollars’ worth of pot you don’t have to do anything, but now all of a sudden that it’s David Lee Roth they could make a whole big deal out of it and really bust his balls for a couple of years.Roth: Guys, I’m outta here. Have a really good day.Stern: Didn’t it sound like he ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-13
  • Study: Legalizing Medical Marijuana Makes People Have More Sex
    Legalizing medical marijuana appears to encourage people to have more sex, according to a recent study. “We find that [medical marijuana laws] cause an increase in sexual activity,” researchers from the University of Connecticut and Georgia State University concluded. That's not the only related effect, however, as the study also determined that there's a decrease in the use of contraceptives and an increase in the number of births following the enactment of medical cannabis policies. To determine how such laws influence how often people have sex, the team of researchers analyzed a large data set that included “detailed questions about sexual activity and substance use” in young people between 1997 and 2011. The survey asked respondents explicitly about past-month marijuana use and sex frequency. The analysis found a 4.3% increase in the “likelihood of having sex once or more in the past month” after a medical cannabis law was enacted and “an increase in sex beginning directly after the law change.” “The primary change in sexual behavior we observe is increased engagement in sexual activity,” researchers wrote.  Additionally, the effect of medical marijuana laws on births translates to a 2% increase, or 684 more births per quarter, “for all women of childbearing range.” “These results provide evidence that marijuana use has a considerable, unintended, and positive effect on birthrates,” the authors wrote in the paper, which was published late last month in the Journal of Health Economics. When it comes to contraceptives, the researchers highlight that the sensory effects of cannabis “may change attitudes toward sexual risks by making users less concerned about the consequences of intercourse, resulting in decreased contraceptive use.” Such behavioral changes could explain why birthrates increase when people have access to medical cannabis, despite what the study authors described as physiological effects associated with marijuana use that could decrease fertility. “Our findings on births suggest that behavioral factors can counteract the physiological changes from marijuana use that tend to decrease fertility,” they wrote. “We find that passage of [medical marijuana laws] result in both increased engagement in sexual activity and decreases in contraceptive use conditional on being sexually active,” the study concludes. “Jointly, both mechanisms suggest that behavioral responses may be due to increased attention to the immediate hedonic effects of sexual contact, increased willingness to engage in sex, as well as delayed discounting and ignoring ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-10
  • Test -post
    asdfjaklsdfklasdl a;lksdjflkajsdf The post Test -post appeared first on Weedmaps News. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-10
  • Auto Draft
    The post Auto Draft appeared first on Weedmaps News. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-10