• Maine Legislature overrides Gov. LePage on medical marijuana reform
    Earlier this month, the Maine Legislature overrode Gov. LePage’s vetoes of LD 238 and LD 1539, bills to improve Maine’s medical marijuana program. LD 238 allows for third-party extraction of medical marijuana. LD 1539 is the culmination of the Health and Human Services Committee’s session-long work reforming the medical marijuana program. The bipartisan omnibus reform bill: removes the qualifying condition list so that any Mainer can use medical marijuana so long as their doctor thinks it would be helpful for them; eliminates the requirement that a patient must designate a caregiver or dispensary as their sole provider, allowing for more patient choice; adds two more dispensaries to the existing eight dispensaries and removes the cap on the dispensaries after January 1, 2021; allows for caregivers to open storefronts, if the town approves; and much more…you can read a summary of the changes here. These reforms are a win for the patients and the industry, and a hearty “Congratulations!” is in order for everyone that worked hard to make this happen. The post Maine Legislature overrides Gov. LePage on medical marijuana reform appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-26
  • Couple Arrested For Southern Oregon Unlicensed Grow Operation
    A couple in Southern Oregon was arrested for violations of Oregon cannabis laws on Monday, July 23rd, 2018. Michael Stanford The post Couple Arrested For Southern Oregon Unlicensed Grow Operation appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-25
  • N.J. hits pause on low-level marijuana prosecutions
    It was a confusing news cycle, with Jersey City’s municipal prosecutor, Jake Hudnut, releasing a memo effectively decriminalizing marijuana locally and state Attorney General Gurbir Grewal declaring that action invalid. Now, AG Grewal has told all prosecutors to “adjourn” (postpone) marijuana prosecutions in municipal court until at least September 4, when his office will issue new guidance. Hopefully, the state will legalize, tax, and regulate marijuana prior to that, and people with pending cases will never be prosecuted. If you are a New Jersey resident, your lawmakers need to hear from you! Please click here to ask them to end New Jersey’s failed policy of marijuana prohibition today, before one more person is branded with a criminal conviction for choosing to use a substance safer than alcohol. In other good news, Asm. Jamel Holley announced plans to propose amendments to improve upon Sen. Nick Scutari’s bill to tax and regulate marijuana, such as making it easier to expunge prior marijuana convictions. We hope the final bill will also include small business opportunities and provisions that ensure that people harmed by prohibition have an opportunity to participate in all aspects of the industry. The post N.J. hits pause on low-level marijuana prosecutions appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-25
  • Klamath Falls Ban Lifting Measure Headed for November Ballot
    The Klamath Strong volunteers were able to raise enough valid signatures to qualify their recreational cannabis initiative for the November The post Klamath Falls Ban Lifting Measure Headed for November Ballot appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-17
  • New Jersey announces it’s doubling the number of medical marijuana businesses
    Good news! Today, the New Jersey Department of Health announced that it will begin accepting applications for six additional businesses that can grow, process, and sell medical cannabis in the state. The winning businesses are supposed to be announced on November 1. Unfortunately, there is no provision yet for equity applicants, although applicants may be awarded up to 50 (out of 1,000) points for diversity. With the tiny number of existing businesses, patients have experienced supply shortages and high prices due to a lack of competition. Today’s expansion should help begin to address these problems, although more will need to be done. Separating the licenses for growing, processing, and selling cannabis will help make many more types of products available to patients, and the health department plans to consider additional applications for these licenses beginning in the fall. In other news, while the June 30 budget deadline came and went without legislative action on any of the pending marijuana bills, Senate President Steve Sweeny has said he believes there could be a vote on legalizing and regulating this summer. If you are a New Jersey resident, click here to ask for your lawmakers’ support. The post New Jersey announces it’s doubling the number of medical marijuana businesses appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-16
  • OP-Ed: New OHA Report on OMMP Completely Misses The Mark
    By Anthony Taylor Compassionate Oregon The just released report–Oregon’s Medical Marijuana Program Operations and Compliance Assessment May 2018–does make a The post OP-Ed: New OHA Report on OMMP Completely Misses The Mark appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-13
  • Cannabis, Alcohol, States and Subsidies
    Recently, there has been some talk here in Oregon that the state is not doing enough to support licensed cannabis businesses economically. These businesses generated more than $70 million in state tax revenue in FY 2017, after all. Although that revenue does not yet approach the combined $373 million in average annual revenue for beer, wine and spirits (combined), it appears to be closing the gap quickly, despite no option for interstate sales. Comparing marijuana and alcohol receipts in Oregon is an awkward proposition, given the fact that Oregon marijuana revenues are collected through sales tax, whereas beer and wine vendors pay the state an excise tax, and liquor is distributed and sold by the state itself. At the end of the day, though, the economic impact of regulated cannabis will continue to gain on–and eat into–the alcohol economy, both in Oregon and nationwide. That is especially true if we factor in industrial hemp. So what is the state doing to subsidize cannabis businesses in Oregon? Not much. The state did pass House Bill 4014 a few years back, which allows cannabis establishments to deduct business expenses allowable under the federal tax code when filing state returns; but that modest gesture pales in comparison to the institutional support given to craft beer and wine. Specifically, here are a few of the ways the wine industry is supported and subsidized by the state of Oregon: The state created the Oregon Wine Board (OWB) to promote development of the wine industry within the state, and coordinate both domestic and report marketing efforts for the industry. OWB receives administrative support from the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, and spends around $2.2 million annually on promoting the Oregon industry. The state created the Oregon Wine Research Institute, housed at Oregon State University, to support Oregon grape growing and wine production. Oregon statutes offer a tax exemption for the first 40,000 gallons, or 151,000 liters, of wine sold annually by any producer in Oregon, which effectively exempts 90% of them from paying any state excise tax. The state offers grants for vineyards in an effort to increase tourism, as well as OWB grants related to viticulture and enology. Oregon winery license fees are paltry compared to cannabis license fees. (Both licenses are issued and billed through the Oregon Liquor Control Commission.) The above list is not exhaustive: It represents about five minutes of lawyerly Google research. And at first glance, the favoritism shown to alcohol by the state feels unfair: As ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-07-12
  • Oklahoma Board of Health restricts voters’ marijuana law
    On June 26, 57% of Oklahoma voters approved SQ 788 — a broad medical marijuana initiative that required swift implementation. The Department of Health had been working for three months on regulations in case the initiative passed and swiftly released draft emergency regulations. MPP and many other advocates and patients submitted comments raising concerns, flagging several regulations that included onerous restrictions inconsistent with SQ 788. Unfortunately, yesterday the Board of Health met to consider those regulations and approved almost all of the regulations we expressed concern about. They also added new restrictions — such as prohibiting the sale of smokeable cannabis. The rules: • Prohibit cannabis from being sold with more than 12% THC in infused products and prohibit plants from exceeding 20% THC. • Prohibit dispensaries from selling smokeable, flower cannabis, and edible cannabis. • Require each dispensary to have a pharmacist on staff. • Require physicians to register before making recommendations, complete medical cannabis-specific training, and screen patients for substance abuse, mental health issues, and whether the patient presents a risk for diversion. • Require physicians to perform a pregnancy test on “females of childbearing years” before recommending cannabis. These restrictions will deprive some patients of the medicine that works best for them, while driving up costs and driving down doctor participation. Advocates are considering next steps, including possible litigation. Stay tuned for updates. Also, we want to express our hearty congratulations to everyone who worked so hard to pass SQ 788! The post Oklahoma Board of Health restricts voters’ marijuana law appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-11
  • Minnesota patients with autism and sleep apnea now qualify for medical cannabis
    Last November, the Minnesota Department of Health approved adding autism spectrum disorders and obstructive sleep apnea as qualifying conditions for the state’s medical cannabis program. Under state law, the additions take effect the following summer. Starting on July 1, 2018, patients with a doctor’s certification and either of those conditions could begin registering for the program. They can start accessing medical cannabis no sooner than August 1. Our allies at Sensible Minnesota offer one-on-one assistance to patients who need help navigating the process. Learn more here. Congratulations to Sensible Minnesota and to all the advocates and health professionals who were involved in petitioning to expand the program! Sensible Minnesota is now working on petitions to expand the program to include opioid use disorder, hepatitis C, Alzheimer’s, traumatic brain injury, and insomnia. If you are a Minnesota medical professional who might be willing to add your voice to the petition, contact Sensible Minnesota at 952-529-4420 or by email. The post Minnesota patients with autism and sleep apnea now qualify for medical cannabis appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-10
  • Hawaii governor considering medical cannabis/opioid bill
    Earlier this year, the Hawaii Legislature overwhelmingly approved SB 2407, which would allow opioid and substance use disorders, and their symptoms, to be treated with medical cannabis if a physician recommends it. But last week, Gov. David Ige announced he intends to veto this compassionate bill. Medical cannabis can ease the devastating symptoms of opiate withdrawal and make it easier for individuals to stay on treatment regimens. For some, this is an issue of life or death. The governor has until July 10 to act on the bill. If you are a resident of Hawaii, please call Gov. Ige at 808-586-0034 or send him an email to urge him to reconsider. We’ve provided some talking points and a draft email message to make the process easy. The post Hawaii governor considering medical cannabis/opioid bill appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-06
  • Church and State: July 1 Deadline Comes and Goes for OMMP Growers
    Oregon medical growers struggling with new system July 1, 2018 That is the date all OMMP grow sites with more The post Church and State: July 1 Deadline Comes and Goes for OMMP Growers appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-05
  • An Activists Fight Against Cancer: July 1
    This is an ongoing column we will be posting from David Williams as he shares his point of view during The post An Activists Fight Against Cancer: July 1 appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-01
  • Oregon Cannabis: OMMP Growers Forced Into METRC
    Now required by OMMP. Back in March 2018, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued temporary rules outlining the requirements for Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) grow sites to track the propagation and production of medical marijuana. The deadline to start tracking in the Cannabis Tracking System (Oregon uses METRC) is today, July 1. You can view the OHA Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, which contains a draft of the new rule, here. The temporary OHA rules required medical marijuana grow sites that service three or more patients to designate someone as the “grow site administrator” by May 31, 2018. The grow site administrator is responsible for signing up for METRC, successfully complete all required METRC training; and ordering unique identification tags and tagging all marijuana items. Oregon Medical Marijuana Program notified grow sites regarding the requirement to designate a grow site administrator by May 31, 2018, so hopefully no registrants missed this deadline. Failure to meet this deadline could result in revocation of the grow site and revocation of the registration of all persons responsible for the marijuana grow site. The other important deadline is today. Required growers (those who grow for three or more patients) must start using METRC at all times going forward. Medical marijuana producers must also have an approved grow site administrator capable of entering required information in METRC (meaning you must have completed the training); an active METRC user account; unique identification tags for the plants; and all medical marijuana items tagged with UID tags and all inventory recorded in METRC. Not coincidentally, today is also the cut-off under Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) rules for nondisclosure of “start-up” inventory by new producer licensees. Previously, that inventory could be from “any source in Oregon” under OAR 845-025-2060(1)(a). Beyond having inventory recorded in METRC, required grows must use METRC to record all transfers of marijuana items to patients, designated primary caregivers, registered medical marijuana dispensaries, processing site, and laboratories. The rules require the following be entered into METRC: the amount of usable marijuana transferred to each patient or designated primary caregiver, the patient or caregiver’s OMMP card number, and the date of the transfer; the amount of usable marijuana, seeds and number of immature plants transferred to each registered dispensary, the dispensary’s OMMP registration number (if any still exist!) and the date of transfer; the amount of usable marijuana transferred to each registered processing site, the processing site’s OMMP registration number and the date of the transfer; and the amount of usable marijuana transferred to each ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-07-01
  • Vermont Legal Recreational Marijuana Begins Sunday, July 1
    Vermont will be the 9th state in America to allow adult use of marijuana starting this Sunday, July 1, 2018. The post Vermont Legal Recreational Marijuana Begins Sunday, July 1 appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-06-29
  • Oregon Cannabis: The Week that Was
    No shortage of cannabis news in Oregon. Here we are a few years into legalization of recreational cannabis sales in Oregon, and it’s never a dull moment. Over the past week or so, there were three significant developments around the state with respect to marijuana law and policy. We summarize each below.      1.     The OLCC hit “pause” on accepting license applications. A few weeks back, we covered the dramatic Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) announcement that it would “pause acceptance of marijuana applications” effective June 15th. The apparent goal was to ensure that our licensing paralegal, Meghan Saunders, would receive hundreds of urgent client emails and phone calls over a two-week period. And she definitely did. The official explanation, of course, is that the agency was simply too far behind to perform adequate services for existing applicants and licensees. That is the explanation OLCC Executive Director Steve Marks gave in the May 30th announcement, and it’s the explanation OLCC Policy Director Jesse Sweet gave at the seminar that he and I co-chaired on June 7th. All in all, it seems like a reasonable explanation. Fortunately, some of the pressure from the initial announcement was alleviated on June 8th, when OLCC clarified that it would consider an application to be timely received for deadline purposes, even if it did not include an approved Land Use Compatibility Statement (LUCS). The pause ultimately took effect last Friday as promised, but not before dozens of our clients submitted last ditch applications (with and without LUCS) and made their way into the forward moving queue. In all, OLCC reports that an astonishing 1,001 additional applications were received in the two week period between its big announcement and the June 15thdeadline. If you are looking for more evidence that people are extremely interested in being involved in the Oregon marijuana industry, the OLCC reports that as of yesterday morning a grand total of 1,915 active licenses currently exist in the state (over half of them producers), with another 766 applicants assigned to investigators, 530 ready for assignment and 1,070 businesses in line but without an approved LUCS. There are also 30,018 active marijuana worker permits statewide, with another 17,217 approved and awaiting payment. Despite intense competition and price instability, people keep on coming.      2.     Billy Williams went to court. Last month, we wrote about the Williams Memo, a policy document authored by Oregon U.S. Attorney Billy Williams regarding his concerns about overproduction of marijuana in Oregon and black market activity. We ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-06-20
 
  • Maine Legislature overrides Gov. LePage on medical marijuana reform
    Earlier this month, the Maine Legislature overrode Gov. LePage’s vetoes of LD 238 and LD 1539, bills to improve Maine’s medical marijuana program. LD 238 allows for third-party extraction of medical marijuana. LD 1539 is the culmination of the Health and Human Services Committee’s session-long work reforming the medical marijuana program. The bipartisan omnibus reform bill: removes the qualifying condition list so that any Mainer can use medical marijuana so long as their doctor thinks it would be helpful for them; eliminates the requirement that a patient must designate a caregiver or dispensary as their sole provider, allowing for more patient choice; adds two more dispensaries to the existing eight dispensaries and removes the cap on the dispensaries after January 1, 2021; allows for caregivers to open storefronts, if the town approves; and much more…you can read a summary of the changes here. These reforms are a win for the patients and the industry, and a hearty “Congratulations!” is in order for everyone that worked hard to make this happen. The post Maine Legislature overrides Gov. LePage on medical marijuana reform appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-26
  • Couple Arrested For Southern Oregon Unlicensed Grow Operation
    A couple in Southern Oregon was arrested for violations of Oregon cannabis laws on Monday, July 23rd, 2018. Michael Stanford The post Couple Arrested For Southern Oregon Unlicensed Grow Operation appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-25
  • N.J. hits pause on low-level marijuana prosecutions
    It was a confusing news cycle, with Jersey City’s municipal prosecutor, Jake Hudnut, releasing a memo effectively decriminalizing marijuana locally and state Attorney General Gurbir Grewal declaring that action invalid. Now, AG Grewal has told all prosecutors to “adjourn” (postpone) marijuana prosecutions in municipal court until at least September 4, when his office will issue new guidance. Hopefully, the state will legalize, tax, and regulate marijuana prior to that, and people with pending cases will never be prosecuted. If you are a New Jersey resident, your lawmakers need to hear from you! Please click here to ask them to end New Jersey’s failed policy of marijuana prohibition today, before one more person is branded with a criminal conviction for choosing to use a substance safer than alcohol. In other good news, Asm. Jamel Holley announced plans to propose amendments to improve upon Sen. Nick Scutari’s bill to tax and regulate marijuana, such as making it easier to expunge prior marijuana convictions. We hope the final bill will also include small business opportunities and provisions that ensure that people harmed by prohibition have an opportunity to participate in all aspects of the industry. The post N.J. hits pause on low-level marijuana prosecutions appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-25
  • Klamath Falls Ban Lifting Measure Headed for November Ballot
    The Klamath Strong volunteers were able to raise enough valid signatures to qualify their recreational cannabis initiative for the November The post Klamath Falls Ban Lifting Measure Headed for November Ballot appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-17
  • New Jersey announces it’s doubling the number of medical marijuana businesses
    Good news! Today, the New Jersey Department of Health announced that it will begin accepting applications for six additional businesses that can grow, process, and sell medical cannabis in the state. The winning businesses are supposed to be announced on November 1. Unfortunately, there is no provision yet for equity applicants, although applicants may be awarded up to 50 (out of 1,000) points for diversity. With the tiny number of existing businesses, patients have experienced supply shortages and high prices due to a lack of competition. Today’s expansion should help begin to address these problems, although more will need to be done. Separating the licenses for growing, processing, and selling cannabis will help make many more types of products available to patients, and the health department plans to consider additional applications for these licenses beginning in the fall. In other news, while the June 30 budget deadline came and went without legislative action on any of the pending marijuana bills, Senate President Steve Sweeny has said he believes there could be a vote on legalizing and regulating this summer. If you are a New Jersey resident, click here to ask for your lawmakers’ support. The post New Jersey announces it’s doubling the number of medical marijuana businesses appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-16
  • OP-Ed: New OHA Report on OMMP Completely Misses The Mark
    By Anthony Taylor Compassionate Oregon The just released report–Oregon’s Medical Marijuana Program Operations and Compliance Assessment May 2018–does make a The post OP-Ed: New OHA Report on OMMP Completely Misses The Mark appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-13
  • Cannabis, Alcohol, States and Subsidies
    Recently, there has been some talk here in Oregon that the state is not doing enough to support licensed cannabis businesses economically. These businesses generated more than $70 million in state tax revenue in FY 2017, after all. Although that revenue does not yet approach the combined $373 million in average annual revenue for beer, wine and spirits (combined), it appears to be closing the gap quickly, despite no option for interstate sales. Comparing marijuana and alcohol receipts in Oregon is an awkward proposition, given the fact that Oregon marijuana revenues are collected through sales tax, whereas beer and wine vendors pay the state an excise tax, and liquor is distributed and sold by the state itself. At the end of the day, though, the economic impact of regulated cannabis will continue to gain on–and eat into–the alcohol economy, both in Oregon and nationwide. That is especially true if we factor in industrial hemp. So what is the state doing to subsidize cannabis businesses in Oregon? Not much. The state did pass House Bill 4014 a few years back, which allows cannabis establishments to deduct business expenses allowable under the federal tax code when filing state returns; but that modest gesture pales in comparison to the institutional support given to craft beer and wine. Specifically, here are a few of the ways the wine industry is supported and subsidized by the state of Oregon: The state created the Oregon Wine Board (OWB) to promote development of the wine industry within the state, and coordinate both domestic and report marketing efforts for the industry. OWB receives administrative support from the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, and spends around $2.2 million annually on promoting the Oregon industry. The state created the Oregon Wine Research Institute, housed at Oregon State University, to support Oregon grape growing and wine production. Oregon statutes offer a tax exemption for the first 40,000 gallons, or 151,000 liters, of wine sold annually by any producer in Oregon, which effectively exempts 90% of them from paying any state excise tax. The state offers grants for vineyards in an effort to increase tourism, as well as OWB grants related to viticulture and enology. Oregon winery license fees are paltry compared to cannabis license fees. (Both licenses are issued and billed through the Oregon Liquor Control Commission.) The above list is not exhaustive: It represents about five minutes of lawyerly Google research. And at first glance, the favoritism shown to alcohol by the state feels unfair: As ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-07-12
  • Oklahoma Board of Health restricts voters’ marijuana law
    On June 26, 57% of Oklahoma voters approved SQ 788 — a broad medical marijuana initiative that required swift implementation. The Department of Health had been working for three months on regulations in case the initiative passed and swiftly released draft emergency regulations. MPP and many other advocates and patients submitted comments raising concerns, flagging several regulations that included onerous restrictions inconsistent with SQ 788. Unfortunately, yesterday the Board of Health met to consider those regulations and approved almost all of the regulations we expressed concern about. They also added new restrictions — such as prohibiting the sale of smokeable cannabis. The rules: • Prohibit cannabis from being sold with more than 12% THC in infused products and prohibit plants from exceeding 20% THC. • Prohibit dispensaries from selling smokeable, flower cannabis, and edible cannabis. • Require each dispensary to have a pharmacist on staff. • Require physicians to register before making recommendations, complete medical cannabis-specific training, and screen patients for substance abuse, mental health issues, and whether the patient presents a risk for diversion. • Require physicians to perform a pregnancy test on “females of childbearing years” before recommending cannabis. These restrictions will deprive some patients of the medicine that works best for them, while driving up costs and driving down doctor participation. Advocates are considering next steps, including possible litigation. Stay tuned for updates. Also, we want to express our hearty congratulations to everyone who worked so hard to pass SQ 788! The post Oklahoma Board of Health restricts voters’ marijuana law appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-11
  • Minnesota patients with autism and sleep apnea now qualify for medical cannabis
    Last November, the Minnesota Department of Health approved adding autism spectrum disorders and obstructive sleep apnea as qualifying conditions for the state’s medical cannabis program. Under state law, the additions take effect the following summer. Starting on July 1, 2018, patients with a doctor’s certification and either of those conditions could begin registering for the program. They can start accessing medical cannabis no sooner than August 1. Our allies at Sensible Minnesota offer one-on-one assistance to patients who need help navigating the process. Learn more here. Congratulations to Sensible Minnesota and to all the advocates and health professionals who were involved in petitioning to expand the program! Sensible Minnesota is now working on petitions to expand the program to include opioid use disorder, hepatitis C, Alzheimer’s, traumatic brain injury, and insomnia. If you are a Minnesota medical professional who might be willing to add your voice to the petition, contact Sensible Minnesota at 952-529-4420 or by email. The post Minnesota patients with autism and sleep apnea now qualify for medical cannabis appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-10
  • Hawaii governor considering medical cannabis/opioid bill
    Earlier this year, the Hawaii Legislature overwhelmingly approved SB 2407, which would allow opioid and substance use disorders, and their symptoms, to be treated with medical cannabis if a physician recommends it. But last week, Gov. David Ige announced he intends to veto this compassionate bill. Medical cannabis can ease the devastating symptoms of opiate withdrawal and make it easier for individuals to stay on treatment regimens. For some, this is an issue of life or death. The governor has until July 10 to act on the bill. If you are a resident of Hawaii, please call Gov. Ige at 808-586-0034 or send him an email to urge him to reconsider. We’ve provided some talking points and a draft email message to make the process easy. The post Hawaii governor considering medical cannabis/opioid bill appeared first on MPP Blog. ... read more
    Source: Marijuana Policy ProjectPublished on 2018-07-06
  • Church and State: July 1 Deadline Comes and Goes for OMMP Growers
    Oregon medical growers struggling with new system July 1, 2018 That is the date all OMMP grow sites with more The post Church and State: July 1 Deadline Comes and Goes for OMMP Growers appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-05
  • An Activists Fight Against Cancer: July 1
    This is an ongoing column we will be posting from David Williams as he shares his point of view during The post An Activists Fight Against Cancer: July 1 appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-07-01
  • Oregon Cannabis: OMMP Growers Forced Into METRC
    Now required by OMMP. Back in March 2018, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued temporary rules outlining the requirements for Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) grow sites to track the propagation and production of medical marijuana. The deadline to start tracking in the Cannabis Tracking System (Oregon uses METRC) is today, July 1. You can view the OHA Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, which contains a draft of the new rule, here. The temporary OHA rules required medical marijuana grow sites that service three or more patients to designate someone as the “grow site administrator” by May 31, 2018. The grow site administrator is responsible for signing up for METRC, successfully complete all required METRC training; and ordering unique identification tags and tagging all marijuana items. Oregon Medical Marijuana Program notified grow sites regarding the requirement to designate a grow site administrator by May 31, 2018, so hopefully no registrants missed this deadline. Failure to meet this deadline could result in revocation of the grow site and revocation of the registration of all persons responsible for the marijuana grow site. The other important deadline is today. Required growers (those who grow for three or more patients) must start using METRC at all times going forward. Medical marijuana producers must also have an approved grow site administrator capable of entering required information in METRC (meaning you must have completed the training); an active METRC user account; unique identification tags for the plants; and all medical marijuana items tagged with UID tags and all inventory recorded in METRC. Not coincidentally, today is also the cut-off under Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) rules for nondisclosure of “start-up” inventory by new producer licensees. Previously, that inventory could be from “any source in Oregon” under OAR 845-025-2060(1)(a). Beyond having inventory recorded in METRC, required grows must use METRC to record all transfers of marijuana items to patients, designated primary caregivers, registered medical marijuana dispensaries, processing site, and laboratories. The rules require the following be entered into METRC: the amount of usable marijuana transferred to each patient or designated primary caregiver, the patient or caregiver’s OMMP card number, and the date of the transfer; the amount of usable marijuana, seeds and number of immature plants transferred to each registered dispensary, the dispensary’s OMMP registration number (if any still exist!) and the date of transfer; the amount of usable marijuana transferred to each registered processing site, the processing site’s OMMP registration number and the date of the transfer; and the amount of usable marijuana transferred to each ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-07-01
  • Vermont Legal Recreational Marijuana Begins Sunday, July 1
    Vermont will be the 9th state in America to allow adult use of marijuana starting this Sunday, July 1, 2018. The post Vermont Legal Recreational Marijuana Begins Sunday, July 1 appeared first on Oregon Cannabis Connection. ... read more
    Source: Oregon Cannabis ConnectionPublished on 2018-06-29
  • Oregon Cannabis: The Week that Was
    No shortage of cannabis news in Oregon. Here we are a few years into legalization of recreational cannabis sales in Oregon, and it’s never a dull moment. Over the past week or so, there were three significant developments around the state with respect to marijuana law and policy. We summarize each below.      1.     The OLCC hit “pause” on accepting license applications. A few weeks back, we covered the dramatic Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) announcement that it would “pause acceptance of marijuana applications” effective June 15th. The apparent goal was to ensure that our licensing paralegal, Meghan Saunders, would receive hundreds of urgent client emails and phone calls over a two-week period. And she definitely did. The official explanation, of course, is that the agency was simply too far behind to perform adequate services for existing applicants and licensees. That is the explanation OLCC Executive Director Steve Marks gave in the May 30th announcement, and it’s the explanation OLCC Policy Director Jesse Sweet gave at the seminar that he and I co-chaired on June 7th. All in all, it seems like a reasonable explanation. Fortunately, some of the pressure from the initial announcement was alleviated on June 8th, when OLCC clarified that it would consider an application to be timely received for deadline purposes, even if it did not include an approved Land Use Compatibility Statement (LUCS). The pause ultimately took effect last Friday as promised, but not before dozens of our clients submitted last ditch applications (with and without LUCS) and made their way into the forward moving queue. In all, OLCC reports that an astonishing 1,001 additional applications were received in the two week period between its big announcement and the June 15thdeadline. If you are looking for more evidence that people are extremely interested in being involved in the Oregon marijuana industry, the OLCC reports that as of yesterday morning a grand total of 1,915 active licenses currently exist in the state (over half of them producers), with another 766 applicants assigned to investigators, 530 ready for assignment and 1,070 businesses in line but without an approved LUCS. There are also 30,018 active marijuana worker permits statewide, with another 17,217 approved and awaiting payment. Despite intense competition and price instability, people keep on coming.      2.     Billy Williams went to court. Last month, we wrote about the Williams Memo, a policy document authored by Oregon U.S. Attorney Billy Williams regarding his concerns about overproduction of marijuana in Oregon and black market activity. We ... read more
    Source: Canna Law Blog – OregonPublished on 2018-06-20