• Berkeley City Council Votes To Allow Cannabis Delivery, Consumption Lounges
    The city council in Berkeley, California voted on Tuesday to make several changes to the municipal code that will allow for cannabis consumption lounges and marijuana delivery services to operate in the city. The unanimous came late Tuesday night after a meeting punctuated by a vigorous debate on the issues, according to media reports. Under the changes, licensed cannabis retailers will be able to allow on-site consumption of marijuana products if the business installs a required ventilation system. Before Tuesday’s meeting, city staff had recommended that consumption lounges be approved by the council. Under previous regulations, the use of cannabis was prohibited in public places, most businesses, and by many landlords, leaving many consumers and medical marijuana patients without a place to legally imbibe. “Providing a place to consume cannabis legally is important for patients who have no other options,” wrote city staff in a report to the council. Cannabis Delivery Services Also Approved The measure approved on Tuesday also allows for up to seven cannabis delivery services to operate in the city and increases the areas of the city where commercial marijuana cultivation is permitted. The changes were supported by the Berkeley Patients Group, a cannabis dispensary that has been serving the local community since 1999. Under the new regulations, the dispensary will have more space for its operations and be able to open a smoking lounge for its patrons. After the vote, the Berkeley Patients Group issued a statement applauding the changes approved by the city council. “We want to thank our city council members for their diligence and thoughtfulness,” the statement reads. “We’d also like to thank the staff, who spent three years researching and developing their prudent recommendations for a post-legalization world,” adding that Berkeley officials “have shaped the most progressive cannabis regulations in the country.” Health Officials and Some Residents Opposed to Changes Allowing cannabis consumption lounges in the city was opposed by the Berkeley Community Health Commission, which expressed concerns about secondhand exposure to marijuana smoke and vapor and the potential risk of drivers getting behind the wheel while high. The commission also said that allowing consumption lounges would be inconsistent with city initiatives to provide smoke-free environments and curb social acceptance of smoking. The relocation of Berkeley Patients Group was opposed by some city residents, including Carol Denney. The new site for the dispensary is located at one of the city’s busiest intersections and near a library and preschool. “If they think that’s the best location, I wonder what a bad location ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-30
  • Utah Health Officials Say Medical Marijuana Program Will Have Slow Start
    The slow-motion rollout of Utah’s voter-approved medical marijuana program hurdles forward, with health officials forecasting a limited launch in the coming weeks. Marc Babitz, deputy director with the Utah Department of Health, told a group of state lawmakers Wednesday that only one or two dispensaries are slated to open in the first week of March, and that even then it will likely be difficult for patients to get a cannabis prescription. That’s because Babitz said the number of physicians who have indicated they’re interested in recommending marijuana for patients is “very limited” — something he attributed to wariness over prescribing a drug that remains illegal on the federal level. “I think this is actually much safer than a lot of the medications that we use,” Babitz said, as quoted by the Associated Press. Medical Marijuana in Utah Voters in Utah approved a referendum legalizing medical marijuana in 2018, making it the 33rd state to do so. But the lead-up to the program’s March launch has been marked by delays and controversies. After voters approved the measure 53 percent to 47 percent, Utah legislators immediately began work on a compromise bill to overwrite the proposal approved at the ballot. The bill passed and was signed into law during a special session in December 2018, dramatically limiting the scope of the measure approved by a majority of voters only a month earlier. Marijuana advocates challenged the bill in court, but the lawsuit was thrown out by the Utah Supreme Court in August. Justice Paige Petersen, writing for the court’s majority, ruled that while the state’s constitution “creates and protects the voters’ right to place legislation on the ballot for approval or rejection by the people, it also carves out an exception to that right.” “When both houses of the legislature pass legislation by a two-thirds supermajority, that law is not subject to a referendum,” Petersen wrote. “Because this renders moot Petitioners’ argument about the constitutionality of the statutory referendum sponsor requirements, we do not address it.” The law passed by the Utah legislature in December 2018 was designed to allow residents to use medical marijuana before patient cards are officially handed out, but only if patients could get approval from a physician; as Babitz said this week, finding a willing medical provider has been a tall order. Earlier this month, health officials in Utah said they would award pharmacy licenses to 10 companies to dispense medical marijuana at 14 sites across the state, with some opening in March and others opening in ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-30
  • Tennessee Man Lights Up Joint in Court To Protest Marijuana Laws
    Out of the mists of confusion and panic that have roiled 2020 heretofore, a hero emerges. Instead of ducking his head, standing up straight, and expressing remorse for his weed during his Tennessee case for small time marijuana possession, one man decided to protest the powers that be, and blazed one for all the court to enjoy.  Defendant Spencer Boston must have really considered how best to convince Judge Haywood Barry that drug prohibition has got to go. The 20 year old had the floor during his trial in Wilson County on Monday, and was expounding on the injustice of banning US residents from consuming cannabis when he gave the legal assemblage a literal whiff of what he was talking about.  Boston removed a joint and a box of matches from his pocket. One can only imagine the courtroom’s reaction when he went ahead and lit the contraband.  Whatever other impression it may have made on Judge Haywood, it may not immediately help Boston retain his liberty. He was abruptly hustled out of the court by security.  Not without saying his final words on the matter, though. As Boston was trundled out, he swiveled around and delivered his conclusion.  “The people deserve better!” he said.  Will Prohibition Ever Be Lifted? There’s a chance that Boston’s actions may have taken place in the waning days of cannabis prohibition in Tennessee. State Sen. Raumesh Akbari filed a bill this week that would regulate recreational marijuana in the state.  “With marijuana now available closer and closer to our state, it’s time for Tennesseans to have a real discussion about repealing outdated penalties for low-level possession and investing in our economic future and public schools through legalization,” Akbari told the press.  Another site of movement in the state legislature is on medical marijuana, which polls suggest has the support of some 81 percent of Tennessee’s population. State Senator Janice Bowling, a Republican, has doggedly reintroduced the same medical cannabis legislation that failed to gain traction last year. Bowling has suggested that medical marijuana could be an antidote for the opioid crisis that claims the lives of Tennessee residents at much higher rates than the rest of the country.  Even as plans have repeatedly stalled on cannabis legalization of any stripe, the state has taken some steps towards decriminalization. Last year the state’s Bureau of Investigation announced that it would no longer be testing cannabis associated with possession cases of under a half-ounce. Since Tennessee has legalized hemp, testing cannabis is the only way to ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Governors, Graded on Weed
    As public support for marijuana reform continues to grow, more governors seem to be taking notice and adopting pro-legalization platforms, according to a gubernatorial scorecard released by the advocacy group NORML on Wednesday. That said, while recent polling shows majority support for legalization among both Democratic and Republican voters, the issue remains deeply partisan at the gubernatorial level. NORML's annual scorecard grades governors based on comments they've made about cannabis issues as well as their policy records. The group identified several key takeaways from this year's report, such as an increased number of top state officials who received a passing grade of “C” or higher. Here are some highlights from the scorecard:  Thirty-two governors (22 Democrats, 10 Republicans) earned a “C” or higher, compared to 27 governors last year.Only nine governors received an “A,” all of whom are Democrats.Twelve governors (11 Democrats, 1 Republican) received a “B.”Eleven governors (9 Republicans, 2 Democrats) earned a “C.”Ten governors (9 Republicans, 1 Democrat) received a “D.”Eight governors, all of whom are Republicans received an “F.” As NORML noted, this partisan divide around cannabis reform isn't totally consistent with polling of the general public. A Gallup survey released last year showed that 66 percent of Americans favor legalization. Although Democratic voters are significantly more likely to back legalization than are those who identify with the GOP, there is majority support across party lines. NORML Releases 2020 Gubernatorial Scorecard https://t.co/ybZmJRrGtJ— NORML (@NORML) January 29, 2020 “It is imperative that constituents know where their governor stands on marijuana law reform. Some can be pushed to be better and others will need to be voted out of office for being a roadblock to progress,” Altieri said. “We hope this scorecard serves as a tool for Americans to directly engage in the political process and put pressure on the leader of their state to join us on the right side of history.” You can use NORML's scorecard to see where your governor stands on cannabis here.  Another signal that marijuana reform is gaining popularity among governors is the frequency of cannabis policy mentions in their annual speeches and official legislative agendas. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) included ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Nebraska Gets Green Light to Start Accepting Hemp Farming Applications
    The US Department of Agriculture announced on Monday that it had approved Nebraska’s plan to regulate hemp agriculture in the state. With the move, the Nebraska Department of Agriculture will begin accepting applications for licenses to grow, process, and sell hemp beginning on Monday. Under the 2018 Farm Bill, industrial hemp was removed from the federal list of controlled substances. The measure also directed the USDA to create a regulatory oversight program for hemp agriculture including provisions for the approval of production plans submitted by states and Native American reservations. State and tribal production plans provide details on practices and procedures for hemp producers to operate in accordance with state and federal law. The Nebraska Department of Agriculture submitted its hemp production plan to the USDA in December. The plan allows for up to 400 hemp cultivation sites and licenses for 270 cultivators, 30 processor-handlers, and 15 brokers. The agriculture department was also authorized to collect $236,000 in license fees to administer the state regulatory program. Growing, handling, or processing hemp without a required state license is against state law. Applications for hemp licenses will be available on the agency’s website beginning on February 3. Nebraska’s regulations require that the agriculture department or a USDA-authorized contractor test samples of hemp within 15 days of harvest to ensure that the crop does not exceed federal THC limits. To legally qualify as hemp, plants must have a THC concentration of no more than 0.3%. Texas and Delaware Plans Also Approved In addition to Nebraska, the USDA said in its announcement on Monday that state hemp agriculture plans for Texas and Delaware had also been approved by the agency. Plans for four Native American communities including the Colorado River Indian Tribes, the Fort Belknap Indian Community, the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, and the Yurok Tribe also received USDA approval. In Texas, state Agricultural Commissioner Sid Miller said on Monday that the production of hemp would soon be a reality in the state. “This is a victory for Texas farmers,” Miller said in a statement. “We are one step closer to giving our ag producers access to this exciting new crop opportunity.” Miller added that it is not yet legal to start growing hemp, saying “we’ve got to get our rules approved and get our licensing program up and running, but the dominoes are dropping pretty quick. We’re almost there.” In the announcement on Monday, federal regulators noted that the first approvals for state hemp agriculture plans were announced in ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Indiana GOP Lawmakers Seek to Override Relaxed Marijuana Laws in Indianapolis
    If local officials no longer want to enforce anti-marijuana laws, Indiana Republicans want the state to step in.  That is the gist of the legislation that was approved Tuesday by a panel in the state senate. The bill would allow the Indiana attorney general’s office to intervene if a county prosecutor were to not enforce a particular law—a direct response to a policy announced last year by the prosecutor of Marion County, where the capital and largest city Indianapolis is located, to no longer pursue simple marijuana possession cases. The bill, introduced by Indianapolis GOP state Sen. Michael Young, was endorsed by a 6-3 vote by a state Senate committee. “It’s because of the social justice prosecution phenomena that’s going on throughout the country,” Young said, as quoted by the Associated Press. “I wanted to try to head it off in Indiana.” Marion County Prosecutor Ryan Mears, a Democrat, announced in September that his office would “no longer prosecute possession of marijuana cases involving approximately one ounce or less of marijuana when the charge is the only or most serious charge against an adult.” “I have come to this decision as a veteran prosecutor. I have seen the resources devoted to these prosecutions and believe those resources can be used more effectively to promote public safety, ensure justice for victims, and reduce recidivism,” Mears said at the time. “When faced with the choice between prosecuting this and prosecuting acts of violence, my priority is clear.” “Too often, an arrest for marijuana possession puts individuals into the system who otherwise would not be. That is not a win for our community,” Mears added. “The enforcement of marijuana policy has disproportionately impacted people of color, and this is a first step to addressing that.” But Indiana Republicans—from the state’s governor to the attorney general to legislators like Young — are not on board with legalization, which has arrived in neighboring states, most recently Illinois. Pot as a Partisan Issue Young’s proposal is yet another example of the partisan divide on the issue in the Hoosier State. Just last month, one of his Young’s Democratic colleagues in the state Senate, Karen Tallian, filed legislation to decriminalize pot.  On Tuesday, Mears told the IndyStar that Republicans like Young were avoiding addressing the issue head on. “I would like to think that the constituents of those elected representatives want to know where their elected officials stand on the issue of marijuana and whether or not medical marijuana is appropriate, or decriminalization is appropriate,” Mears told ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Everything You Should Know About The Rosinbomb Rocket
    In the modern age of weed, few things are as exciting as making your own dabs, and the Rosinbomb Rocket gives the ever-growing concentrate community the opportunity to do just that.  In 2014, Rosinbomb entered the cannabis space after Ryan Mayer, president and founder of Maverick Technologies, switched from pressing fruits and vegetables to pressing dabs. At the time that rosin started making waves, Mayer threw some heat plates on his juice press and Rosinbomb was born.  What is the Rosinbomb Rocket? Rosinbomb released the Rocket in November 2017. This tabletop press is still considered one of the best personal use rosin presses on the market. One standout selling point is that it can reach up to 1,500 pounds of pressure without a bulky and loud air compressor, which makes it fine to put on a coffee table or kitchen counter. Mayer wants people, whether medical or recreational, to have complete control over what they are putting into their bodies. “That's where the Rocket was born,” Mayer said, “We just keep trying to nip at our own heels and create, and innovate.” An electric actuator, which controls the presses movement mechanism, allows the Rocket to operate smoothly without an air compressor The Rocket is meant to feel like a home appliance. Setup For a surprising amount of innovation and structure, the Rosinbomb is extremely simple to set up. “There's not a lot to do. When you take it out of the box, you plug it into the wall, wait five minutes for it to heat up and you're pushing the “up” button to smash.”  At full pressure, the Rocket will be pulling three amps of electricity. You'll also have to take into account the ten inches of clearance it will need from the surface you're putting it on to the top of the device, but the setup is minimal.  How to use the Rosinbomb Rocket Mayer explains that there are lots of little things you can do to increase the yield, as well as temperature adjustments to get the product exactly how you like. But the most important thing for the best end product is the quality of the material used. That can range from shake or trim material to best-case-scenario fresh frozen flowers. If you're handling flower and you want rosin that is a bit more buttery and tasty, Mayer recommends setting the temperature between 175°— 220°F. For flowers, you'll want to be on the higher range of the heat ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Our Cheap Step-by-Step Guide to Cleaning Your Grinder
    If you're like me, you typically clean your smoking accessories only when it's absolutely necessary. Pipes and bongs are usually the first on the list — when your friend comes by for a smoke sesh and looks at your bong with disgust, you know it's time to whip out the glass cleaning solution. Yet grinders tend to slip through the cracks despite weeks of gummy resin build-up which make them basically unusable.  It takes true, admirable dedication to keep a grinder clean. @ the girl dressed in a full suit cleaning out her grinder opposite me on the bus - go off sis— dj delimeats (@gothsperm) December 12, 2019 But hey, new year new me, right? This is the year I stop mistreating my grinder (which has been nothing but kind to me and deserves way better). And if money is tight or you just prefer a good deal, no need to splurge on fancy cleaning supplies — sparkling accessories will never break the bank with our cheap and easy guide to a well-scrubbed grinder.  Why clean your grinder?  While cleaning your grinder might be low on your to-do list, you'd be surprised by how much it can improve your smoking experience. For starters, a clean grinder is a more efficient grinder, which can produce more usable weed and more kief. When a grinder is full of gunk, it's much more difficult to achieve a fine grind and thus, very little magical fairy dust will accumulate at the bottom.  cleaning your grinder pic.twitter.com/YPoVZrunt4— You Know My Name (@LookAtDustin) June 25, 2016 You can also extend the life of your smoking accessories with a little TLC. If you're guilty of never cleaning your grinder, you've probably had to throw one away because of damage caused by frequent use. Over time, too much stickiness will cause the teeth to become dull or snap off, or worse — you can end up with metal shavings mixed in with your flower. Too much strain on the teeth of a metal grinder can cause it to deteriorate without you noticing right away.  Plus, keeping your grinder clean prevents the plant matter inside from breaking down and growing mold or bacteria. While I've never noticed anything funky happen to my grinder, this is a genuine fear of mine now that I've learned that it's possible. So to help you help yourself, ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Our Cheap Step-by-Step Guide to Cleaning Your Grinder
    If you're like me, you typically clean your smoking accessories only when it's absolutely necessary. Pipes and bongs are usually the first on the list — when your friend comes by for a smoke sesh and looks at your bong with disgust, you know it's time to whip out the glass cleaning solution. Yet grinders tend to slip through the cracks despite weeks of gummy resin build-up which make them basically unusable.  It takes true, admirable dedication to keep a grinder clean. @ the girl dressed in a full suit cleaning out her grinder opposite me on the bus - go off sis— dj delimeats (@gothsperm) December 12, 2019 But hey, new year new me, right? This is the year I stop mistreating my grinder (which has been nothing but kind to me and deserves way better). And if money is tight or you just prefer a good deal, no need to splurge on fancy cleaning supplies — sparkling accessories will never break the bank with our cheap and easy guide to a well-scrubbed grinder.  Why clean your grinder?  While cleaning your grinder might be low on your to-do list, you'd be surprised by how much it can improve your smoking experience. For starters, a clean grinder is a more efficient grinder, which can produce more usable weed and more kief. When a grinder is full of gunk, it's much more difficult to achieve a fine grind and thus, very little magical fairy dust will accumulate at the bottom.  cleaning your grinder pic.twitter.com/YPoVZrunt4— You Know My Name (@LookAtDustin) June 25, 2016 You can also extend the life of your smoking accessories with a little TLC. If you're guilty of never cleaning your grinder, you've probably had to throw one away because of damage caused by frequent use. Over time, too much stickiness will cause the teeth to become dull or snap off, or worse — you can end up with metal shavings mixed in with your flower. Too much strain on the teeth of a metal grinder can cause it to deteriorate without you noticing right away.  Plus, keeping your grinder clean prevents the plant matter inside from breaking down and growing mold or bacteria. While I've never noticed anything funky happen to my grinder, this is a genuine fear of mine now that I've learned that it's possible. So to help you help yourself, ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Cleveland City Council Eliminates Penalties for Simple Cannabis Possession
    The city council in Cleveland voted on Monday to end all penalties for possession of up to 200 grams, or just over 7 ounces, of cannabis, effectively decriminalizing marijuana in Ohio’s second-largest city. “What we’re proposing is zero fines, zero jail time for anyone who has up to 200 grams of marijuana,” said Councilman Blaine A. Griffin, the sponsor of the ordinance, before the vote was taken. “Let this be a bold first step in how we look at 21st Century policing,” he added at Monday’s meeting. Cleveland joins several other Ohio cities, including Cincinnati, Columbus, Dayton, and Toledo, that have recently decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana. Under state law, possession of up to 100 grams of cannabis except by registered medical marijuana patients is subject to a fine of up to $150. Being caught with 100 to 200 grams of pot is punishable by up to 30 days in jail and a fine of $250. Let’s Hear It for Hemp! Because of the legalization of hemp under federal law, prosecuting cannabis offenses now requires expensive lab testing to determine the concentration of THC in suspected marijuana. Samples that contain 0.3% or less THC are hemp and legal to possess. Chris Hartung, the chief of police in Vermillion, Ohio, announced last summer that his department would no longer enforce low-level marijuana violations, saying the city could not afford the required testing. Without lab results, “we cannot prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the suspect was in possession of marijuana as opposed to hemp,” he wrote in an email to local media. Cleveland’s ordinance was first passed with a unanimous vote by the city council’s safety committee two weeks ago. At the time, Griffin, who represents the city’s Ward 6, said that the measure would help end the racial disparity common in the enforcement of marijuana laws. “We have always known that African-Americans are sometimes seven times more likely to be charged with marijuana possession,” he said. “In addition to good government, this is really trying to create an equitable policy, as well as moving to the 21st century and away from the ’70s, when it comes to marijuana and cannabis use,” he said. Last week, the city council in Austin, Texas passed similar legislation to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana. However, only one day later the city’s police chief announced that despite the council’s action, his department would continue to make arrests and write tickets for possession of small amounts of cannabis. The post Cleveland ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Legislative Committee To Discuss Major Marijuana Reform Bill in New Mexico
    After New Mexico’s governor predicted that legalization of cannabis is a priority for some lawmakers this year, a Democratic state senator has proposed a bill that would regulate adult use. SB 115 will be reviewed for the first time by a legislative committee on Tuesday.  The initiative would make it mandatory for recreational dispensaries to supply state-subsidized medical marijuana to patients. The plan looks to learn from the experiences of cannabis legislation in other states like Oregon, where medical marijuana has become scarce when recreational becomes legal.  This is far from the first indication that New Mexican lawmakers are looking to push a legalization agenda this year. Earlier this month, the state’s Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham commented at a Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce luncheon that regulation of adult use cannabis could prove to be “an economic game-changer.”  “If we are clear-eyed about the risks, we have to be clear-eyed about the opportunity,” said Grisham — a nod to the bipartisan policy makers in the state’s legislature that are unconvinced that access to marijuana is without its health risks. Last June, Grisham established a group to explore the feasibility of cannabis regulation.  Albuquerque Senator Gerald Ortiz y Pino introduced the legislation, which would establish an automatic expungement process for individuals with past cannabis-related criminal convictions.  It would require local governments to allow for recreational industry activity — a measure that is presented as a way of fighting against illegal market cannabis sales. That language was taken from recommendations published by the governor’s task force earlier this month.  Marijuana in New Mexico Last year, New Mexican lawmakers were also presented with a draft of legalization legislation. Though it passed the House, it was unable to clear the Senate. Both chambers are controlled by Democrats in New Mexico, but cannabis legalization is not an issue that cleaves cleanly to party lines in the state. Some prominent Democrat elected officials have expressed their doubts regarding cannabis legalization, while some Republicans have thrown their support behind plans to regulate the drug. The state’s medical marijuana program saw a considerable expansion last year of the number of qualifying conditions. Health Secretary Kathyleen Kunkel signed off on the addition of opioid dependency as a new entry to medical cannabis treatment. New Mexico has consistently seen higher than average rates of opioid abuse among its population.  Last July, a New Mexico decriminalization law took effect that reduced the maximum sentence for possession of less than a half ounce of cannabis from 15 days in jail to a $50 fee, ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-28
  • California Officials Report Dangerous Additives Present in Seized Illegal Vapes
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — California officials announced Monday that marijuana vape cartridges seized in illegal shops in Los Angeles contained potentially dangerous additives, including a thickening agent blamed for a national outbreak of deadly lung illnesses tied to vaping. Officials also found that the illegal vapes confiscated in the December raids typically were not as potent as advertised, and sometimes contained just a fraction of the THC claimed on the labels, according to state testing results. THC is the chemical in marijuana that makes users feel high. The findings highlight the risk for consumers at underground shops and delivery services that are common in Los Angeles and elsewhere around California, officials said. “The prevalence of dirty and dangerous vape pens at unlicensed cannabis stores demonstrate how important it is for consumers to purchase cannabis goods from licensed retailers, which are required to sell products that meet state testing and labeling standards,” said Lori Ajax, who heads California’s Bureau of Cannabis Control. The state conducted tests on the marijuana oil contained in a random sample of more than 10,000 illegal vape pens seized in the Los Angeles raids. The tests found that 75% of the vapes contained undisclosed additives, including the thickening agent vitamin E acetate, which has been blamed by federal regulators for the majority of lung illnesses tied to the outbreak. In some samples, oil in the cartridges was diluted by more than one-third by potentially dangerous and undisclosed additives. Nearly all the samples were labeled with incorrect THC content, the state found. For example, one cartridge claimed the oil was up to 85% THC, but actually contained 33% THC. Some vape products seized from the unlicensed stores contained as little as 18% THC. California Combatting Unregulated Cannabis The findings were released just days after the state announced another effort to slow the spread of the illegal pot market, where consumers shop when they want to avoid hefty taxes or can’t locate a legally licensed shop. Last Thursday, regulators proposed rules that would require legal shops to post a unique black-and-white code in storefront windows to help consumers identify licensed businesses. Shoppers would use smartphones to scan the familiar, boxy label known as a QR code — similar to a bar code — to determine if businesses are selling legal, tested cannabis products. The codes also would also be required when transporting or delivering cannabis. California — the world’s largest legal pot market — launched broad, legal sales in January 2018. But the illicit market has continued to thrive, ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Our Cheap Step-by-Step Guide to Cleaning Your Grinder
    If you're like me, you typically clean your smoking accessories only when it's absolutely necessary. Pipes and bongs are usually the first on the list — when your friend comes by for a smoke sesh and looks at your bong with disgust, you know it's time to whip out the glass cleaning solution. Yet grinders tend to slip through the cracks despite weeks of gummy resin build-up which make them basically unusable.  @ the girl dressed in a full suit cleaning out her grinder opposite me on the bus - go off sis— dj delimeats (@gothsperm) December 12, 2019 But hey, new year new me, right? This is the year I stop mistreating my grinder (which has been nothing but kind to me and deserves way better). And if money is tight or you just prefer a good deal, no need to splurge on fancy cleaning supplies — sparkling accessories will never break the bank with our cheap and easy guide to a well-scrubbed grinder.  Why clean your grinder?  While cleaning your grinder might be low on your to-do list, you'd be surprised by how much it can improve your smoking experience. For starters, a clean grinder is a more efficient grinder, which can produce more usable weed and more kief. When a grinder is full of gunk, it's much more difficult to achieve a fine grind and thus, very little magical fairy dust will accumulate at the bottom.  cleaning your grinder pic.twitter.com/YPoVZrunt4— You Know My Name (@LookAtDustin) June 25, 2016 You can also extend the life of your smoking accessories with a little TLC. If you're guilty of never cleaning your grinder, you've probably had to throw one away because of damage caused by frequent use. Over time, too much stickiness will cause the teeth to become dull or snap off, or worse — you can end up with metal shavings mixed in with your flower. Too much strain on the teeth of a metal grinder can cause it to deteriorate without you noticing right away.  Plus, keeping your grinder clean prevents the plant matter inside from breaking down and growing mold or bacteria. While I've never noticed anything funky happen to my grinder, this is a genuine fear of mine now that I've learned that it's possible. So to help you help yourself, follow our step-by-step guide below on how to properly clean a ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Katie Cazorla Knows How to Party
    When Katie Cazorla and I connect by phone, she’s in great spirits, enjoying the lull that accompanies the aftermath of the holiday season in Los Angeles. She’s back home in the city for a brief stint before embarking on an upcoming a string of shows at the Tropicana Laugh Factory in Las Vegas with Bill Dawes February 17th through the 23rd. What inspired you to move from New York to Los Angeles and pursue a career in comedy? I went to college at The University of Kentucky and there was this club where you could win a pitcher of beer for your table if you got up on stage and told a joke. Whoever got the biggest crowd reaction would win. All my friends were like, “You’re funny, you should go up there and tell a joke.” So I got up there and told a joke about lesbians, an “anybody can be a lesbian” type of thing. Everybody laughed and I won the beer. The club owner then suggested I come back every week as “a ringer” to get the crowd going. So I was basically a fluffer. Some agent ended up seeing me there—Janie Olmstead—from Images Model & Talent Agency. She was like, “You have something. I’m going to this competition in Los Angeles, you should come. I’ll take you and we’ll see what happens.” I ended up going and winning my division. I still have the trophies. Anyway, I got signed. It was February of 1999. I flew back to college, said fuck college, packed up my shit in Elmira that summer and drove cross-country to Los Angeles. But it wasn’t easy. I lived in my car for two months. I was desperate for work but couldn’t get a job because I didn’t have a place to live. Every application I filled out people were like, “Where do you live?” And I was like, “In my car! Wherever the back parking lot is.” It was awful. My first job was at Dimples, which was this karaoke bar in Burbank. Then I got a job at Barney’s Beanery in West Hollywood hosting karaoke. At the same time, I would do stand-up at Dublin’s, which was the go to [comedy] place back in the day. Oh, when Dane Cook was coming up. Dane was actually my neighbor on Crescent Heights. He would walk me home sometimes from Dublin’s, which was super nice of him. Then he got weird and famous. I don’t know what happened, I think some bad shit ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-28
  • What’s in Your Stash? Julia Jacobson, Aster Farms, California
    Julia Jacobson has suffered migraines for years, with one lasting as long as eight days. In 2016, she had a migraine to top all migraines—it lasted six months and came with vomiting and dehydration that landed her in the hospital on three separate occasions. “I’ll never forget the day it began—September 22,” she shared. “It messed with my vision; I saw spots and auras. At times I couldn’t see at all,” she shared. “I was prescribed antidepressants and high blood pressure medications. Some of the meds they gave me had me dropping things, bumping into furniture.” She was prescribed myriad medications, including Lidocaine shots and steroids. Jacobson said one of the meds, Imitrex, was so intense and had such severe side effects that the prescription was limited to two pills in a 24 hour period, with two doses in a two week period. She tried migraine glasses and had visits to an acupuncturist and chiropractor to no avail.  “I just had a big mess of side effects and nothing worked,” she added. “My husband and I were thinking of having kids, and you can’t be on some of these medications while pregnant.” Jacobson began using Prana transdermal roll-on 3-1 and Mary’s Medicinals CBD/THC patches. She also found a certain cultivar to be more helpful than others. “White Buffalo is high in CBG, which they’ve discovered is a vascular dilator for blood vessels in the brain – it protects neurons,” she explained. “I also use Protab, a high CBG tablet made by Level.” CBG is also effective in repairing neurological damage, according to a study titled “Neuroprotective Properties of Cannabigerol in Huntington’s Disease,” published in the journal Neurotherapeutics.  Courtesy of Julia Jacobson From Bloomies to Bud Jacobson was born in Chicago and attended college on the East Coast, majoring in Comparative Literature. She moved to New York as a young woman and spent four years as a buyer for Bloomingdale’s department store.  Today, she’s traded Bloomies for bud, making her home in her husband Sam’s hometown of Oakland, California.  Her husband’s lineage in cannabis dates back to his grandparents, who moved to Mendocino County 50 years ago to grow cannabis. His parents grew up in the once covert industry, working as trimmers while Sam slept in a crib nearby. Mendocino is part of the infamous Emerald Triangle, including Humboldt and Trinity, where some of the finest cannabis in the world has been hybridized, perfected, and grown for as many years. Aster Farms sits on 80 acres in Lake County, just south ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-27
 
  • Berkeley City Council Votes To Allow Cannabis Delivery, Consumption Lounges
    The city council in Berkeley, California voted on Tuesday to make several changes to the municipal code that will allow for cannabis consumption lounges and marijuana delivery services to operate in the city. The unanimous came late Tuesday night after a meeting punctuated by a vigorous debate on the issues, according to media reports. Under the changes, licensed cannabis retailers will be able to allow on-site consumption of marijuana products if the business installs a required ventilation system. Before Tuesday’s meeting, city staff had recommended that consumption lounges be approved by the council. Under previous regulations, the use of cannabis was prohibited in public places, most businesses, and by many landlords, leaving many consumers and medical marijuana patients without a place to legally imbibe. “Providing a place to consume cannabis legally is important for patients who have no other options,” wrote city staff in a report to the council. Cannabis Delivery Services Also Approved The measure approved on Tuesday also allows for up to seven cannabis delivery services to operate in the city and increases the areas of the city where commercial marijuana cultivation is permitted. The changes were supported by the Berkeley Patients Group, a cannabis dispensary that has been serving the local community since 1999. Under the new regulations, the dispensary will have more space for its operations and be able to open a smoking lounge for its patrons. After the vote, the Berkeley Patients Group issued a statement applauding the changes approved by the city council. “We want to thank our city council members for their diligence and thoughtfulness,” the statement reads. “We’d also like to thank the staff, who spent three years researching and developing their prudent recommendations for a post-legalization world,” adding that Berkeley officials “have shaped the most progressive cannabis regulations in the country.” Health Officials and Some Residents Opposed to Changes Allowing cannabis consumption lounges in the city was opposed by the Berkeley Community Health Commission, which expressed concerns about secondhand exposure to marijuana smoke and vapor and the potential risk of drivers getting behind the wheel while high. The commission also said that allowing consumption lounges would be inconsistent with city initiatives to provide smoke-free environments and curb social acceptance of smoking. The relocation of Berkeley Patients Group was opposed by some city residents, including Carol Denney. The new site for the dispensary is located at one of the city’s busiest intersections and near a library and preschool. “If they think that’s the best location, I wonder what a bad location ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-30
  • Utah Health Officials Say Medical Marijuana Program Will Have Slow Start
    The slow-motion rollout of Utah’s voter-approved medical marijuana program hurdles forward, with health officials forecasting a limited launch in the coming weeks. Marc Babitz, deputy director with the Utah Department of Health, told a group of state lawmakers Wednesday that only one or two dispensaries are slated to open in the first week of March, and that even then it will likely be difficult for patients to get a cannabis prescription. That’s because Babitz said the number of physicians who have indicated they’re interested in recommending marijuana for patients is “very limited” — something he attributed to wariness over prescribing a drug that remains illegal on the federal level. “I think this is actually much safer than a lot of the medications that we use,” Babitz said, as quoted by the Associated Press. Medical Marijuana in Utah Voters in Utah approved a referendum legalizing medical marijuana in 2018, making it the 33rd state to do so. But the lead-up to the program’s March launch has been marked by delays and controversies. After voters approved the measure 53 percent to 47 percent, Utah legislators immediately began work on a compromise bill to overwrite the proposal approved at the ballot. The bill passed and was signed into law during a special session in December 2018, dramatically limiting the scope of the measure approved by a majority of voters only a month earlier. Marijuana advocates challenged the bill in court, but the lawsuit was thrown out by the Utah Supreme Court in August. Justice Paige Petersen, writing for the court’s majority, ruled that while the state’s constitution “creates and protects the voters’ right to place legislation on the ballot for approval or rejection by the people, it also carves out an exception to that right.” “When both houses of the legislature pass legislation by a two-thirds supermajority, that law is not subject to a referendum,” Petersen wrote. “Because this renders moot Petitioners’ argument about the constitutionality of the statutory referendum sponsor requirements, we do not address it.” The law passed by the Utah legislature in December 2018 was designed to allow residents to use medical marijuana before patient cards are officially handed out, but only if patients could get approval from a physician; as Babitz said this week, finding a willing medical provider has been a tall order. Earlier this month, health officials in Utah said they would award pharmacy licenses to 10 companies to dispense medical marijuana at 14 sites across the state, with some opening in March and others opening in ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-30
  • Tennessee Man Lights Up Joint in Court To Protest Marijuana Laws
    Out of the mists of confusion and panic that have roiled 2020 heretofore, a hero emerges. Instead of ducking his head, standing up straight, and expressing remorse for his weed during his Tennessee case for small time marijuana possession, one man decided to protest the powers that be, and blazed one for all the court to enjoy.  Defendant Spencer Boston must have really considered how best to convince Judge Haywood Barry that drug prohibition has got to go. The 20 year old had the floor during his trial in Wilson County on Monday, and was expounding on the injustice of banning US residents from consuming cannabis when he gave the legal assemblage a literal whiff of what he was talking about.  Boston removed a joint and a box of matches from his pocket. One can only imagine the courtroom’s reaction when he went ahead and lit the contraband.  Whatever other impression it may have made on Judge Haywood, it may not immediately help Boston retain his liberty. He was abruptly hustled out of the court by security.  Not without saying his final words on the matter, though. As Boston was trundled out, he swiveled around and delivered his conclusion.  “The people deserve better!” he said.  Will Prohibition Ever Be Lifted? There’s a chance that Boston’s actions may have taken place in the waning days of cannabis prohibition in Tennessee. State Sen. Raumesh Akbari filed a bill this week that would regulate recreational marijuana in the state.  “With marijuana now available closer and closer to our state, it’s time for Tennesseans to have a real discussion about repealing outdated penalties for low-level possession and investing in our economic future and public schools through legalization,” Akbari told the press.  Another site of movement in the state legislature is on medical marijuana, which polls suggest has the support of some 81 percent of Tennessee’s population. State Senator Janice Bowling, a Republican, has doggedly reintroduced the same medical cannabis legislation that failed to gain traction last year. Bowling has suggested that medical marijuana could be an antidote for the opioid crisis that claims the lives of Tennessee residents at much higher rates than the rest of the country.  Even as plans have repeatedly stalled on cannabis legalization of any stripe, the state has taken some steps towards decriminalization. Last year the state’s Bureau of Investigation announced that it would no longer be testing cannabis associated with possession cases of under a half-ounce. Since Tennessee has legalized hemp, testing cannabis is the only way to ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Governors, Graded on Weed
    As public support for marijuana reform continues to grow, more governors seem to be taking notice and adopting pro-legalization platforms, according to a gubernatorial scorecard released by the advocacy group NORML on Wednesday. That said, while recent polling shows majority support for legalization among both Democratic and Republican voters, the issue remains deeply partisan at the gubernatorial level. NORML's annual scorecard grades governors based on comments they've made about cannabis issues as well as their policy records. The group identified several key takeaways from this year's report, such as an increased number of top state officials who received a passing grade of “C” or higher. Here are some highlights from the scorecard:  Thirty-two governors (22 Democrats, 10 Republicans) earned a “C” or higher, compared to 27 governors last year.Only nine governors received an “A,” all of whom are Democrats.Twelve governors (11 Democrats, 1 Republican) received a “B.”Eleven governors (9 Republicans, 2 Democrats) earned a “C.”Ten governors (9 Republicans, 1 Democrat) received a “D.”Eight governors, all of whom are Republicans received an “F.” As NORML noted, this partisan divide around cannabis reform isn't totally consistent with polling of the general public. A Gallup survey released last year showed that 66 percent of Americans favor legalization. Although Democratic voters are significantly more likely to back legalization than are those who identify with the GOP, there is majority support across party lines. NORML Releases 2020 Gubernatorial Scorecard https://t.co/ybZmJRrGtJ— NORML (@NORML) January 29, 2020 “It is imperative that constituents know where their governor stands on marijuana law reform. Some can be pushed to be better and others will need to be voted out of office for being a roadblock to progress,” Altieri said. “We hope this scorecard serves as a tool for Americans to directly engage in the political process and put pressure on the leader of their state to join us on the right side of history.” You can use NORML's scorecard to see where your governor stands on cannabis here.  Another signal that marijuana reform is gaining popularity among governors is the frequency of cannabis policy mentions in their annual speeches and official legislative agendas. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) included ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Nebraska Gets Green Light to Start Accepting Hemp Farming Applications
    The US Department of Agriculture announced on Monday that it had approved Nebraska’s plan to regulate hemp agriculture in the state. With the move, the Nebraska Department of Agriculture will begin accepting applications for licenses to grow, process, and sell hemp beginning on Monday. Under the 2018 Farm Bill, industrial hemp was removed from the federal list of controlled substances. The measure also directed the USDA to create a regulatory oversight program for hemp agriculture including provisions for the approval of production plans submitted by states and Native American reservations. State and tribal production plans provide details on practices and procedures for hemp producers to operate in accordance with state and federal law. The Nebraska Department of Agriculture submitted its hemp production plan to the USDA in December. The plan allows for up to 400 hemp cultivation sites and licenses for 270 cultivators, 30 processor-handlers, and 15 brokers. The agriculture department was also authorized to collect $236,000 in license fees to administer the state regulatory program. Growing, handling, or processing hemp without a required state license is against state law. Applications for hemp licenses will be available on the agency’s website beginning on February 3. Nebraska’s regulations require that the agriculture department or a USDA-authorized contractor test samples of hemp within 15 days of harvest to ensure that the crop does not exceed federal THC limits. To legally qualify as hemp, plants must have a THC concentration of no more than 0.3%. Texas and Delaware Plans Also Approved In addition to Nebraska, the USDA said in its announcement on Monday that state hemp agriculture plans for Texas and Delaware had also been approved by the agency. Plans for four Native American communities including the Colorado River Indian Tribes, the Fort Belknap Indian Community, the Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska, and the Yurok Tribe also received USDA approval. In Texas, state Agricultural Commissioner Sid Miller said on Monday that the production of hemp would soon be a reality in the state. “This is a victory for Texas farmers,” Miller said in a statement. “We are one step closer to giving our ag producers access to this exciting new crop opportunity.” Miller added that it is not yet legal to start growing hemp, saying “we’ve got to get our rules approved and get our licensing program up and running, but the dominoes are dropping pretty quick. We’re almost there.” In the announcement on Monday, federal regulators noted that the first approvals for state hemp agriculture plans were announced in ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Indiana GOP Lawmakers Seek to Override Relaxed Marijuana Laws in Indianapolis
    If local officials no longer want to enforce anti-marijuana laws, Indiana Republicans want the state to step in.  That is the gist of the legislation that was approved Tuesday by a panel in the state senate. The bill would allow the Indiana attorney general’s office to intervene if a county prosecutor were to not enforce a particular law—a direct response to a policy announced last year by the prosecutor of Marion County, where the capital and largest city Indianapolis is located, to no longer pursue simple marijuana possession cases. The bill, introduced by Indianapolis GOP state Sen. Michael Young, was endorsed by a 6-3 vote by a state Senate committee. “It’s because of the social justice prosecution phenomena that’s going on throughout the country,” Young said, as quoted by the Associated Press. “I wanted to try to head it off in Indiana.” Marion County Prosecutor Ryan Mears, a Democrat, announced in September that his office would “no longer prosecute possession of marijuana cases involving approximately one ounce or less of marijuana when the charge is the only or most serious charge against an adult.” “I have come to this decision as a veteran prosecutor. I have seen the resources devoted to these prosecutions and believe those resources can be used more effectively to promote public safety, ensure justice for victims, and reduce recidivism,” Mears said at the time. “When faced with the choice between prosecuting this and prosecuting acts of violence, my priority is clear.” “Too often, an arrest for marijuana possession puts individuals into the system who otherwise would not be. That is not a win for our community,” Mears added. “The enforcement of marijuana policy has disproportionately impacted people of color, and this is a first step to addressing that.” But Indiana Republicans—from the state’s governor to the attorney general to legislators like Young — are not on board with legalization, which has arrived in neighboring states, most recently Illinois. Pot as a Partisan Issue Young’s proposal is yet another example of the partisan divide on the issue in the Hoosier State. Just last month, one of his Young’s Democratic colleagues in the state Senate, Karen Tallian, filed legislation to decriminalize pot.  On Tuesday, Mears told the IndyStar that Republicans like Young were avoiding addressing the issue head on. “I would like to think that the constituents of those elected representatives want to know where their elected officials stand on the issue of marijuana and whether or not medical marijuana is appropriate, or decriminalization is appropriate,” Mears told ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Everything You Should Know About The Rosinbomb Rocket
    In the modern age of weed, few things are as exciting as making your own dabs, and the Rosinbomb Rocket gives the ever-growing concentrate community the opportunity to do just that.  In 2014, Rosinbomb entered the cannabis space after Ryan Mayer, president and founder of Maverick Technologies, switched from pressing fruits and vegetables to pressing dabs. At the time that rosin started making waves, Mayer threw some heat plates on his juice press and Rosinbomb was born.  What is the Rosinbomb Rocket? Rosinbomb released the Rocket in November 2017. This tabletop press is still considered one of the best personal use rosin presses on the market. One standout selling point is that it can reach up to 1,500 pounds of pressure without a bulky and loud air compressor, which makes it fine to put on a coffee table or kitchen counter. Mayer wants people, whether medical or recreational, to have complete control over what they are putting into their bodies. “That's where the Rocket was born,” Mayer said, “We just keep trying to nip at our own heels and create, and innovate.” An electric actuator, which controls the presses movement mechanism, allows the Rocket to operate smoothly without an air compressor The Rocket is meant to feel like a home appliance. Setup For a surprising amount of innovation and structure, the Rosinbomb is extremely simple to set up. “There's not a lot to do. When you take it out of the box, you plug it into the wall, wait five minutes for it to heat up and you're pushing the “up” button to smash.”  At full pressure, the Rocket will be pulling three amps of electricity. You'll also have to take into account the ten inches of clearance it will need from the surface you're putting it on to the top of the device, but the setup is minimal.  How to use the Rosinbomb Rocket Mayer explains that there are lots of little things you can do to increase the yield, as well as temperature adjustments to get the product exactly how you like. But the most important thing for the best end product is the quality of the material used. That can range from shake or trim material to best-case-scenario fresh frozen flowers. If you're handling flower and you want rosin that is a bit more buttery and tasty, Mayer recommends setting the temperature between 175°— 220°F. For flowers, you'll want to be on the higher range of the heat ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-29
  • Our Cheap Step-by-Step Guide to Cleaning Your Grinder
    If you're like me, you typically clean your smoking accessories only when it's absolutely necessary. Pipes and bongs are usually the first on the list — when your friend comes by for a smoke sesh and looks at your bong with disgust, you know it's time to whip out the glass cleaning solution. Yet grinders tend to slip through the cracks despite weeks of gummy resin build-up which make them basically unusable.  It takes true, admirable dedication to keep a grinder clean. @ the girl dressed in a full suit cleaning out her grinder opposite me on the bus - go off sis— dj delimeats (@gothsperm) December 12, 2019 But hey, new year new me, right? This is the year I stop mistreating my grinder (which has been nothing but kind to me and deserves way better). And if money is tight or you just prefer a good deal, no need to splurge on fancy cleaning supplies — sparkling accessories will never break the bank with our cheap and easy guide to a well-scrubbed grinder.  Why clean your grinder?  While cleaning your grinder might be low on your to-do list, you'd be surprised by how much it can improve your smoking experience. For starters, a clean grinder is a more efficient grinder, which can produce more usable weed and more kief. When a grinder is full of gunk, it's much more difficult to achieve a fine grind and thus, very little magical fairy dust will accumulate at the bottom.  cleaning your grinder pic.twitter.com/YPoVZrunt4— You Know My Name (@LookAtDustin) June 25, 2016 You can also extend the life of your smoking accessories with a little TLC. If you're guilty of never cleaning your grinder, you've probably had to throw one away because of damage caused by frequent use. Over time, too much stickiness will cause the teeth to become dull or snap off, or worse — you can end up with metal shavings mixed in with your flower. Too much strain on the teeth of a metal grinder can cause it to deteriorate without you noticing right away.  Plus, keeping your grinder clean prevents the plant matter inside from breaking down and growing mold or bacteria. While I've never noticed anything funky happen to my grinder, this is a genuine fear of mine now that I've learned that it's possible. So to help you help yourself, ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Our Cheap Step-by-Step Guide to Cleaning Your Grinder
    If you're like me, you typically clean your smoking accessories only when it's absolutely necessary. Pipes and bongs are usually the first on the list — when your friend comes by for a smoke sesh and looks at your bong with disgust, you know it's time to whip out the glass cleaning solution. Yet grinders tend to slip through the cracks despite weeks of gummy resin build-up which make them basically unusable.  It takes true, admirable dedication to keep a grinder clean. @ the girl dressed in a full suit cleaning out her grinder opposite me on the bus - go off sis— dj delimeats (@gothsperm) December 12, 2019 But hey, new year new me, right? This is the year I stop mistreating my grinder (which has been nothing but kind to me and deserves way better). And if money is tight or you just prefer a good deal, no need to splurge on fancy cleaning supplies — sparkling accessories will never break the bank with our cheap and easy guide to a well-scrubbed grinder.  Why clean your grinder?  While cleaning your grinder might be low on your to-do list, you'd be surprised by how much it can improve your smoking experience. For starters, a clean grinder is a more efficient grinder, which can produce more usable weed and more kief. When a grinder is full of gunk, it's much more difficult to achieve a fine grind and thus, very little magical fairy dust will accumulate at the bottom.  cleaning your grinder pic.twitter.com/YPoVZrunt4— You Know My Name (@LookAtDustin) June 25, 2016 You can also extend the life of your smoking accessories with a little TLC. If you're guilty of never cleaning your grinder, you've probably had to throw one away because of damage caused by frequent use. Over time, too much stickiness will cause the teeth to become dull or snap off, or worse — you can end up with metal shavings mixed in with your flower. Too much strain on the teeth of a metal grinder can cause it to deteriorate without you noticing right away.  Plus, keeping your grinder clean prevents the plant matter inside from breaking down and growing mold or bacteria. While I've never noticed anything funky happen to my grinder, this is a genuine fear of mine now that I've learned that it's possible. So to help you help yourself, ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Cleveland City Council Eliminates Penalties for Simple Cannabis Possession
    The city council in Cleveland voted on Monday to end all penalties for possession of up to 200 grams, or just over 7 ounces, of cannabis, effectively decriminalizing marijuana in Ohio’s second-largest city. “What we’re proposing is zero fines, zero jail time for anyone who has up to 200 grams of marijuana,” said Councilman Blaine A. Griffin, the sponsor of the ordinance, before the vote was taken. “Let this be a bold first step in how we look at 21st Century policing,” he added at Monday’s meeting. Cleveland joins several other Ohio cities, including Cincinnati, Columbus, Dayton, and Toledo, that have recently decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana. Under state law, possession of up to 100 grams of cannabis except by registered medical marijuana patients is subject to a fine of up to $150. Being caught with 100 to 200 grams of pot is punishable by up to 30 days in jail and a fine of $250. Let’s Hear It for Hemp! Because of the legalization of hemp under federal law, prosecuting cannabis offenses now requires expensive lab testing to determine the concentration of THC in suspected marijuana. Samples that contain 0.3% or less THC are hemp and legal to possess. Chris Hartung, the chief of police in Vermillion, Ohio, announced last summer that his department would no longer enforce low-level marijuana violations, saying the city could not afford the required testing. Without lab results, “we cannot prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the suspect was in possession of marijuana as opposed to hemp,” he wrote in an email to local media. Cleveland’s ordinance was first passed with a unanimous vote by the city council’s safety committee two weeks ago. At the time, Griffin, who represents the city’s Ward 6, said that the measure would help end the racial disparity common in the enforcement of marijuana laws. “We have always known that African-Americans are sometimes seven times more likely to be charged with marijuana possession,” he said. “In addition to good government, this is really trying to create an equitable policy, as well as moving to the 21st century and away from the ’70s, when it comes to marijuana and cannabis use,” he said. Last week, the city council in Austin, Texas passed similar legislation to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana. However, only one day later the city’s police chief announced that despite the council’s action, his department would continue to make arrests and write tickets for possession of small amounts of cannabis. The post Cleveland ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Legislative Committee To Discuss Major Marijuana Reform Bill in New Mexico
    After New Mexico’s governor predicted that legalization of cannabis is a priority for some lawmakers this year, a Democratic state senator has proposed a bill that would regulate adult use. SB 115 will be reviewed for the first time by a legislative committee on Tuesday.  The initiative would make it mandatory for recreational dispensaries to supply state-subsidized medical marijuana to patients. The plan looks to learn from the experiences of cannabis legislation in other states like Oregon, where medical marijuana has become scarce when recreational becomes legal.  This is far from the first indication that New Mexican lawmakers are looking to push a legalization agenda this year. Earlier this month, the state’s Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham commented at a Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce luncheon that regulation of adult use cannabis could prove to be “an economic game-changer.”  “If we are clear-eyed about the risks, we have to be clear-eyed about the opportunity,” said Grisham — a nod to the bipartisan policy makers in the state’s legislature that are unconvinced that access to marijuana is without its health risks. Last June, Grisham established a group to explore the feasibility of cannabis regulation.  Albuquerque Senator Gerald Ortiz y Pino introduced the legislation, which would establish an automatic expungement process for individuals with past cannabis-related criminal convictions.  It would require local governments to allow for recreational industry activity — a measure that is presented as a way of fighting against illegal market cannabis sales. That language was taken from recommendations published by the governor’s task force earlier this month.  Marijuana in New Mexico Last year, New Mexican lawmakers were also presented with a draft of legalization legislation. Though it passed the House, it was unable to clear the Senate. Both chambers are controlled by Democrats in New Mexico, but cannabis legalization is not an issue that cleaves cleanly to party lines in the state. Some prominent Democrat elected officials have expressed their doubts regarding cannabis legalization, while some Republicans have thrown their support behind plans to regulate the drug. The state’s medical marijuana program saw a considerable expansion last year of the number of qualifying conditions. Health Secretary Kathyleen Kunkel signed off on the addition of opioid dependency as a new entry to medical cannabis treatment. New Mexico has consistently seen higher than average rates of opioid abuse among its population.  Last July, a New Mexico decriminalization law took effect that reduced the maximum sentence for possession of less than a half ounce of cannabis from 15 days in jail to a $50 fee, ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-28
  • California Officials Report Dangerous Additives Present in Seized Illegal Vapes
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — California officials announced Monday that marijuana vape cartridges seized in illegal shops in Los Angeles contained potentially dangerous additives, including a thickening agent blamed for a national outbreak of deadly lung illnesses tied to vaping. Officials also found that the illegal vapes confiscated in the December raids typically were not as potent as advertised, and sometimes contained just a fraction of the THC claimed on the labels, according to state testing results. THC is the chemical in marijuana that makes users feel high. The findings highlight the risk for consumers at underground shops and delivery services that are common in Los Angeles and elsewhere around California, officials said. “The prevalence of dirty and dangerous vape pens at unlicensed cannabis stores demonstrate how important it is for consumers to purchase cannabis goods from licensed retailers, which are required to sell products that meet state testing and labeling standards,” said Lori Ajax, who heads California’s Bureau of Cannabis Control. The state conducted tests on the marijuana oil contained in a random sample of more than 10,000 illegal vape pens seized in the Los Angeles raids. The tests found that 75% of the vapes contained undisclosed additives, including the thickening agent vitamin E acetate, which has been blamed by federal regulators for the majority of lung illnesses tied to the outbreak. In some samples, oil in the cartridges was diluted by more than one-third by potentially dangerous and undisclosed additives. Nearly all the samples were labeled with incorrect THC content, the state found. For example, one cartridge claimed the oil was up to 85% THC, but actually contained 33% THC. Some vape products seized from the unlicensed stores contained as little as 18% THC. California Combatting Unregulated Cannabis The findings were released just days after the state announced another effort to slow the spread of the illegal pot market, where consumers shop when they want to avoid hefty taxes or can’t locate a legally licensed shop. Last Thursday, regulators proposed rules that would require legal shops to post a unique black-and-white code in storefront windows to help consumers identify licensed businesses. Shoppers would use smartphones to scan the familiar, boxy label known as a QR code — similar to a bar code — to determine if businesses are selling legal, tested cannabis products. The codes also would also be required when transporting or delivering cannabis. California — the world’s largest legal pot market — launched broad, legal sales in January 2018. But the illicit market has continued to thrive, ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Our Cheap Step-by-Step Guide to Cleaning Your Grinder
    If you're like me, you typically clean your smoking accessories only when it's absolutely necessary. Pipes and bongs are usually the first on the list — when your friend comes by for a smoke sesh and looks at your bong with disgust, you know it's time to whip out the glass cleaning solution. Yet grinders tend to slip through the cracks despite weeks of gummy resin build-up which make them basically unusable.  @ the girl dressed in a full suit cleaning out her grinder opposite me on the bus - go off sis— dj delimeats (@gothsperm) December 12, 2019 But hey, new year new me, right? This is the year I stop mistreating my grinder (which has been nothing but kind to me and deserves way better). And if money is tight or you just prefer a good deal, no need to splurge on fancy cleaning supplies — sparkling accessories will never break the bank with our cheap and easy guide to a well-scrubbed grinder.  Why clean your grinder?  While cleaning your grinder might be low on your to-do list, you'd be surprised by how much it can improve your smoking experience. For starters, a clean grinder is a more efficient grinder, which can produce more usable weed and more kief. When a grinder is full of gunk, it's much more difficult to achieve a fine grind and thus, very little magical fairy dust will accumulate at the bottom.  cleaning your grinder pic.twitter.com/YPoVZrunt4— You Know My Name (@LookAtDustin) June 25, 2016 You can also extend the life of your smoking accessories with a little TLC. If you're guilty of never cleaning your grinder, you've probably had to throw one away because of damage caused by frequent use. Over time, too much stickiness will cause the teeth to become dull or snap off, or worse — you can end up with metal shavings mixed in with your flower. Too much strain on the teeth of a metal grinder can cause it to deteriorate without you noticing right away.  Plus, keeping your grinder clean prevents the plant matter inside from breaking down and growing mold or bacteria. While I've never noticed anything funky happen to my grinder, this is a genuine fear of mine now that I've learned that it's possible. So to help you help yourself, follow our step-by-step guide below on how to properly clean a ... read more
    Source: Marijuana.comPublished on 2020-01-28
  • Katie Cazorla Knows How to Party
    When Katie Cazorla and I connect by phone, she’s in great spirits, enjoying the lull that accompanies the aftermath of the holiday season in Los Angeles. She’s back home in the city for a brief stint before embarking on an upcoming a string of shows at the Tropicana Laugh Factory in Las Vegas with Bill Dawes February 17th through the 23rd. What inspired you to move from New York to Los Angeles and pursue a career in comedy? I went to college at The University of Kentucky and there was this club where you could win a pitcher of beer for your table if you got up on stage and told a joke. Whoever got the biggest crowd reaction would win. All my friends were like, “You’re funny, you should go up there and tell a joke.” So I got up there and told a joke about lesbians, an “anybody can be a lesbian” type of thing. Everybody laughed and I won the beer. The club owner then suggested I come back every week as “a ringer” to get the crowd going. So I was basically a fluffer. Some agent ended up seeing me there—Janie Olmstead—from Images Model & Talent Agency. She was like, “You have something. I’m going to this competition in Los Angeles, you should come. I’ll take you and we’ll see what happens.” I ended up going and winning my division. I still have the trophies. Anyway, I got signed. It was February of 1999. I flew back to college, said fuck college, packed up my shit in Elmira that summer and drove cross-country to Los Angeles. But it wasn’t easy. I lived in my car for two months. I was desperate for work but couldn’t get a job because I didn’t have a place to live. Every application I filled out people were like, “Where do you live?” And I was like, “In my car! Wherever the back parking lot is.” It was awful. My first job was at Dimples, which was this karaoke bar in Burbank. Then I got a job at Barney’s Beanery in West Hollywood hosting karaoke. At the same time, I would do stand-up at Dublin’s, which was the go to [comedy] place back in the day. Oh, when Dane Cook was coming up. Dane was actually my neighbor on Crescent Heights. He would walk me home sometimes from Dublin’s, which was super nice of him. Then he got weird and famous. I don’t know what happened, I think some bad shit ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-28
  • What’s in Your Stash? Julia Jacobson, Aster Farms, California
    Julia Jacobson has suffered migraines for years, with one lasting as long as eight days. In 2016, she had a migraine to top all migraines—it lasted six months and came with vomiting and dehydration that landed her in the hospital on three separate occasions. “I’ll never forget the day it began—September 22,” she shared. “It messed with my vision; I saw spots and auras. At times I couldn’t see at all,” she shared. “I was prescribed antidepressants and high blood pressure medications. Some of the meds they gave me had me dropping things, bumping into furniture.” She was prescribed myriad medications, including Lidocaine shots and steroids. Jacobson said one of the meds, Imitrex, was so intense and had such severe side effects that the prescription was limited to two pills in a 24 hour period, with two doses in a two week period. She tried migraine glasses and had visits to an acupuncturist and chiropractor to no avail.  “I just had a big mess of side effects and nothing worked,” she added. “My husband and I were thinking of having kids, and you can’t be on some of these medications while pregnant.” Jacobson began using Prana transdermal roll-on 3-1 and Mary’s Medicinals CBD/THC patches. She also found a certain cultivar to be more helpful than others. “White Buffalo is high in CBG, which they’ve discovered is a vascular dilator for blood vessels in the brain – it protects neurons,” she explained. “I also use Protab, a high CBG tablet made by Level.” CBG is also effective in repairing neurological damage, according to a study titled “Neuroprotective Properties of Cannabigerol in Huntington’s Disease,” published in the journal Neurotherapeutics.  Courtesy of Julia Jacobson From Bloomies to Bud Jacobson was born in Chicago and attended college on the East Coast, majoring in Comparative Literature. She moved to New York as a young woman and spent four years as a buyer for Bloomingdale’s department store.  Today, she’s traded Bloomies for bud, making her home in her husband Sam’s hometown of Oakland, California.  Her husband’s lineage in cannabis dates back to his grandparents, who moved to Mendocino County 50 years ago to grow cannabis. His parents grew up in the once covert industry, working as trimmers while Sam slept in a crib nearby. Mendocino is part of the infamous Emerald Triangle, including Humboldt and Trinity, where some of the finest cannabis in the world has been hybridized, perfected, and grown for as many years. Aster Farms sits on 80 acres in Lake County, just south ... read more
    Source: High TimesPublished on 2020-01-27